NCU Catalog - April 2018 
    
    Nov 27, 2022  
NCU Catalog - April 2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Codes and Course Length

Course Codes

NCU course codes include a course prefix and number. The course prefix identifies the content area of a course and the number identifies the course-level (e.g., Undergraduate, Master’s. etc.). Courses in this catalog section are list by School and content area in numerical order.

Example: The course prefix “ACC” indicates Accounting content

Course Numbering

Course numbering used at NCU is as follows:

Undergraduate 1000 to 4999
Master’s 5000 to 6999;
5000-8 to 6999-8
Doctoral and Advance Studies Certificates 7000 to 8999;
7000-8 to 8999-8
Doctoral Sequence Courses

9000 to 9799; 
9901A-C to 9904A-C

Course Length

Course length varies by course and program. Please refer to the course listing in this catalog to determine the length of a specific course.

 

Marriage and Family Therapy

  
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    MFT-6103 - Cultural Diversity, Gender, and Family Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course addresses issues related to diversity and power and privilege as they relate to culture, ethnicity, gender, nationality, race, religion, sexual orientation, disability, and spirituality. Each of these characteristics is examined with respect to the relevance they have to the profession and practice of marriage and family therapy.
  
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    MFT-6102 - Psychopathology, Diagnosis, and Systemic Treatment

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Using a relational/systemic perspective, this course will address the traditional psychodiagnostic categories as outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The focus of the course content is on the assessment and treatment of major mental health issues outlining the comparison between the psychiatric diagnostic classification system and relational systems-based approaches.
  
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    MFT-6101 - Human Development and Family Dynamics Across the Lifespan

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course will include content on individual and family development across the lifespan. The human development course has specific emphasis given to developmentally appropriate and atypical transitions related to common concerns in marriage and family therapy. Students will appraise the issues related to human development and lifespan using a systems-based perspective.
  
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    MFT-5106 - Research Methods and Evidence Based Practice

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course provides students with an understanding of clinical research methods and design. In addition, it addresses the relevance of research to students’ clinical work. Students will investigate existing research and research methods used in marriage and family therapy, both quantitative and qualitative. Ethical issues and considerations in research will also be addresses, as well as learning to critically evaluate existing research. A primary aim of the course is to help students become evidence-based practitioners.
  
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    MFT-5105 - Recovery-Oriented Care and Postmodern Family Therapy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This Master’s level course focuses on post-modern models and treatment trends in marriage and family therapy including the philosophy of social constructionism and the narrative, solution focused, and collaborative models, and the recovery model. Course content will enable students to conceptualize and distinguish recent epistemological issues and address contemporary conceptual directions in the field of marriage and family therapy. Students will complete short essays, case studies, and assorted assignments to address a wide variety of presenting clinical problems and issues such as gender and racial diversity and discrimination, feminism, substance abuse, and recovery from mental illness.
  
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    MFT-5105CA - Recovery-Oriented Care & Postmodern Family Therapy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This Master’s level course focuses on postmodern models and treatment trends in marriage and family therapy including the philosophy of social constructionism and the narrative, solution focused, collaborative models, and the recovery model. Course content will enable students to conceptualize and distinguish recent epistemological issues and address contemporary conceptual directions in the field of marriage and family therapy. Students will complete short essays, case studies and assorted assignments to address a wide variety of presenting clinical problems and issues such as gender and racial diversity and discrimination, feminism, substance abuse, and recovery from mental illness.
  
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    MFT-5104 - Treatment Planning and Traditional Family Therapy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This Master’s level course provides students with a strong foundation in classic and intergenerational models in the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. To deepen this understanding of these models, the course also focuses on their application through theory-based treatment planning. The course is designed to allow students to gain a deeper awareness of the important relationship between theory and practice through the study and application of theory to client situations. The two primary areas of focus in this course are: 1) understanding the Classic Models of the field and; 2) the development of theoretically consistent treatment plans that include attention to the diversity of influences on family life using therapeutic models that purposefully address such influences.
  
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    MFT-5104CA - Treatment Planning and Traditional Family Therapy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This Master’s level course provides students with a strong foundation in classic and intergenerational models in the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. To deepen this understanding of these models, the course also focuses on their application through theory-based treatment planning. The course is designed to allow students to gain a deeper awareness of the important relationship between theory and practice through the study and application of theory to client situations. The two primary areas of focus in this course are: 1) understanding the Classic Models of the field and; 2) the development of theoretically consistent treatment plans that include attention to the diversity of influences on family life using therapeutic models that purposefully address such influences.
  
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    MFT-5103 - Systemic Evaluation and Case Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This Master’s level course provides an opportunity to review various assessments and evaluations tools utilized by marriage and family therapists for clinical and research purposes as well as an overview of psychological test construction, administration, and interpretation. The course will explore systemic evaluations measures for individuals, couples, and families. Students will examine differences between individually based and systems-based forms of assessment. In addition, students will be invited to consider diversity as one of the fundamental components of a successful and productive evaluation. This course trains students how to conduct a “Needs Assessment” and standard case management methods including identifying and aligning clients with appropriate community resources. Students will identify and visit community resources in their community.
  
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    MFT-5103CA - Systemic Evaluation and Case Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This Master’s level course provides an opportunity to review various assessments and evaluations tools utilized by marriage and family therapists for clinical and research purposes as well as an overview of psychological test construction, administration, and interpretation. The course will explore systemic evaluations measures for individuals, couples, and families. Students will examine differences between individually based and systems-based forms of assessment. In addition, students will be invited to consider diversity as one of the fundamental components of a successful and productive evaluation. This course trains students how to conduct a “Needs Assessment” and standard case management methods including identifying and aligning clients with appropriate community resources. Students will identify and visit community resources in their community.
  
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    MFT-5102 - Legal, Ethical and Professional Development in Marriage and Family Therapy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course focuses on legal and ethical issues related to the profession of marriage and family therapy and the practice of individual, couple, and family therapy. The course includes content regarding professional identity, including professional socialization, scope of practice, professional organizations, licensure, and certification.
  
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    MFT-5101 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Marriage and Family Therapy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Students will complete the course with a better understanding of systems theory concepts and the role of systemic dynamics within diverse populations. This course is also an orientation to Northcentral University and to the essential skills needed to pursue a Master of Arts degree in Marriage and Family Therapy. Graduate-level skills, such as goal building, time management, academic integrity, effective use of the Northcentral Library, the use of APA form and style in professional communication, and critical thinking skills are introduced.

Nursing Education

  
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    NUR-7005 - Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will learn evaluation methods used in nursing education curriculum. Content includes norm referenced and criterion referenced evaluation methods. Students will identify criteria used to develop reliable and valid evaluation measures. Students will explore measures used to identify cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains as they relate to education and nursing. Current issues and research related to educational testing instruments, alternatives to standardized evaluation methods, and outcome measurement in education will be discussed.
  
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    NUR-7004 - Teaching with Technology in Nursing Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Student will learn the importance of reflection on teaching with technology in nursing education in the classroom and clinical settings. The goal of this course is to ensure that students have an understanding of technology tools that can create diverse and meaningful learning experiences for students. The course is designed to examine current technology trends including simulation, online learning, learning management systems, instructional design, web 2.0 tools, computer assisted learning, presentation software, EHRs, and videos. Through discussion and sharing, students refine their skills in using these tools to practice as an educator.
  
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    NUR-7003 - Evidenced Based Teaching in Nursing

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The student will learn the foundational knowledge in the science of nursing education for developing skills and behaviors for contemporary nursing education practice and scholarship. This course explores current evidence based andragogic practices within the nursing education discipline.
  
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    NUR-7002 - The Nurse as Educator

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will learn the evolving roles of the nurse educator within the context of an ever-changing health care system and educational environment. The focus is on the educator as a teacher, leader, collaborator, mentor, and change agent. The principles underlying the teaching of adult learners will be examined and applied to classroom and clinical settings. It is anticipated that, at the end of the course, the learner will have formulated a personal working philosophy of nursing education.
  
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    NUR-7001 - Future of Nursing Education - Challenges for the Educational Leader

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will learn the future opportunities and challenges in nursing education from the views of a reflective practitioner. Through the course, learners will discuss regulatory, ethical, and political challenges instructional and supervisory leaders face in nursing education. Also, the learners will focus on how educational leaders explore and act upon challenges and opportunities.
  
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    NUR-7000 - Nursing Education Theories and Concepts

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Student will learn relevant theories and concepts that are the underpinnings of the profession of nursing, education and other healthcare disciplines. Through the course, students will identify the foundational multidisciplinary concepts applicable to nursing education and future research endeavors. Students will review seminal studies from nursing practice, education and research, as well as from social sciences.

Organizational Leadership

  
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    OL-7105 - Leadership in Organizational Change

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine coaching principles and theories along with their applications in leadership roles. This course incorporates the student’s experiences and observations regarding leadership from both personal and professional environments. Topics include: competencies for coaches, coaching theories, assessment models, and case study analysis related to coaching.
  
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    OL-7104 - Leadership in Nonprofit Organizations

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students gain a deep understanding of the complexity of moral dilemmas through critical analysis and application of ethical principles, as leadership is not an event, but a process that takes time. Interpersonal dynamics operating within an organizational structure and the systemic nature of such structures is examined. Students examine their own ethical profile, and how it impacts their communication with individuals and groups. This process includes oral, print, and electronic communications.
  
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    OL-7103 - Theory and Practice of Organizational Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine leadership theories and their applications in current educational organization settings. Students will assess the definition and study of leadership in an educational organization and how it has developed over time. Student will have the opportunity to reevaluate present and historical leadership models based on educational trends. This course is intended to provide the student a link between theory and application of leadership from a variety of research-based perspectives.
  
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    OL-7102 - Leadership Ethics to Attain Organizational Excellence

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course students will deepen their philosophy of leadership which serves as the foundation for applying the knowledge and skill sets acquired through their specialization and degree program. The development and implementation of leadership concepts, applications, and frameworks to drive leadership performance for excellence are highlighted. The continued and increasingly successful application of the knowledge, tools, skill sets, and perspectives that have been learned will also be emphasized.
  
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    OL-7101 - Building Organizational Capacity

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    There are numerous definitions for the phrase “capacity building” within educational and leadership literature. For the purpose of this Doctoral level course, the term “building organizational capacity” will be used to describe a parallel universe, where both the students’ capacity and the organization’s capacity must be developed to achieve organizational goals. Students will analyze their own organization to assess internal and external capacity, reviewing all tangible and intangible portions of the organization to understand their individual and collective impact on achieving maximum effectiveness and productivity. Simultaneously, students will also critically evaluate their own role within the organization as it relates to building capacity.
  
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    OL-7100 - Conflict Resolution and Mediation

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Leaders must become adept at interpreting conflict and identifying options that result in a favorable outcome for all stakeholders. Constructive responses and mediation skills developed through a focused effort to understand communication patterns, interpersonal relationships, and communication skills can produce successful conflict resolution. Theory, self-reflection and enhancement of conflict skills, cultural understanding, structure, and practice of collaborative and mediated negotiations are emphasized.
  
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    OL-7100 - Conflict Resolution and Mediation

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Leaders must become adept at interpreting conflict and identifying options that result in a favorable outcome for all stakeholders. Constructive responses and mediation skills developed through a focused effort to understand communication patterns, interpersonal relationships, and communication skills can produce successful conflict resolution. Theory, self-reflection and enhancement of conflict skills, cultural understanding, structure, and practice of collaborative and mediated negotiations are emphasized.
  
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    OL-7008B - Executive Leadership in Nonprofit Organizations

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine the principles and practices of executive leaders in nonprofit organizations. This course incorporates assessing leadership challenges, strategic planning, organizational capacity, fiduciary responsibilities, marketing and communication, and developing a SWOT analysis.
  
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    OL-7007B - Leader as Coach

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine coaching principles and theories along with their applications in leadership roles. This course incorporates the student’s experiences and observations regarding leadership from both personal and professional environments. Topics include: competencies for coaches, coaching theories, assessment models, and case study analysis related to coaching.
  
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    OL-7005B - Ethical Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students gain a deep understanding of the complexity of moral dilemmas through critical analysis and application of ethical principles, as leadership is not an event, but a process that takes time. Interpersonal dynamics operating within an organizational structure and the systemic nature of such structures is examined. Students examine their own ethical profile, and how it impacts their communication with individuals and groups. This process includes oral, print, and electronic communications.
  
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    OL-7004B - Theory and Practice of Organizational Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine in-depth leadership theories and their applications in current organizational settings. This course incorporates the student’s experiences and observations regarding leadership from their personal and professional experiences and current work setting. Topics include: leadership principals, ethical leadership, organizational culture, and reflective practice.
  
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    OL-7003B - Leadership for Excellence

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course students will deepen their philosophy of leadership which serves as the foundation for applying the knowledge and skill sets acquired through their specialization and degree program. The development and implementation of leadership concepts, applications, and frameworks to drive leadership performance for excellence are highlighted. The continued and increasingly successful application of the knowledge, tools, skill sets, and perspectives that have been learned will also be emphasized.
  
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    OL-7002B - Building Organizational Capacity

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    There are numerous definitions for the phrase “capacity building” within educational and leadership literature. For the purpose of this Doctoral level course, the term “building organizational capacity” will be used to describe a parallel universe, where both the students’ capacity and the organization’s capacity must be developed to achieve organizational goals. Students will analyze their own organization to assess internal and external capacity, reviewing all tangible and intangible portions of the organization to understand their individual and collective impact on achieving maximum effectiveness and productivity. Simultaneously, students will also critically evaluate their own role within the organization as it relates to building capacity.
  
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    OL-7001B - Conflict Resolution and Mediation

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students must become adept at interpreting conflict and identifying options that result in a favorable outcome for all stakeholders. Constructive responses and mediation skills developed through a focused effort to understand communication patterns, interpersonal relationships, and communication skills can produce successful conflict resolution. Theory, self-reflection, and enhancement of conflict skills, cultural understanding, structure, and practice of collaborative and mediated negotiations are emphasized.
  
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    OL-5103 - Leading Change and Organizational Renewal

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students gain a deep understanding of the complexity of organizational ethics and ethical leadership through critical analysis and research regarding ethical principles. Students will research and evaluate consequences of unethical leadership, and how to build and maintain a culture of ethics. Students will assess ethics as they pertain to the globalization of organizations.
  
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    OL-5103 - Leading Change and Organizational Renewal

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students gain a deep understanding of the complexity of organizational ethics and ethical leadership through critical analysis and research regarding ethical principles. Students will research and evaluate consequences of unethical leadership, and how to build and maintain a culture of ethics. Students will assess ethics as they pertain to the globalization of organizations.
  
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    OL-5102 - Applied Research for Organizational Leaders

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The Theory and Practice of Organizational Leadership course focuses on theories of leadership as they apply to organizational success. In this course, students will learn about various theoretical and applied leadership theories and practices. Students will also identify theories and practices appropriate for their own use in their own organizations.
  
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    OL-5101 - Organizational Capacity 

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Capacity building, an integral aspect of organizational leadership, involves investing in the right people for the right roles, and implementing the necessary systems to optimize their success. In this course, students will learn theories and best practices having to do with leadership’s role in building and maintaining organizational capacity.
  
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    OL-5100 - Resolving Conflict 

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine the principles and practices of executive leaders in non-profit organizations. This course incorporates assessing leadership challenges, strategic planning, organizational capacity, fiduciary responsibilities, marketing and communication, and developing a SWOT analysis.
  
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    OLB-7008 - Executive Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Leadership strategies are often unique to a specific organizational sector (corporate, governmental, not-for-profit, etc.). In this course, students will examine cross- disciplinary leadership theories and strategies for their appropriateness to particular sectors. Students will also examine tactical aspects of leadership useful to particular organizational cultures.
  
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    OLB-7007 - Leader as Coach/Consultant

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Coaches and consultants (internal and external) have become an important part of organizational reality. In this course, students will examine coaching and consulting theories and application.  Students will also explore their skills in adapting their styles to particular organizational contexts, through both effective communication and astute analyses and recommendations.
  
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    OLB-7006 - Communicating Change

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    As change is inevitable in organizations, leaders must learn how to effectively handle and communicate change. Theories and practices related to change typically focus on tactical behaviors or linear approaches for managing change. In this course, students will examine the theories that underpin such approaches. Understanding the role of communication is essential.
  
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    OLB-7005 - Ethical Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students gain a deep understanding of the complexity of organizational ethics and ethical leadership through critical analysis and research regarding ethical principles. Students will research and evaluate consequences of unethical leadership, and how to build and maintain a culture of ethics. Students will assess ethics as they pertain to the globalization of organizations.
  
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    OLB-7004 - Theory and Practice of Organizational Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The Theory and Practice of Organizational Leadership course focuses on theories of leadership as they apply to organizational success. In this course, students will learn about various theoretical and applied leadership theories and practices. Students will also identify theories and practices appropriate for their own use in their own organizations.
  
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    OLB-7002 - Building Organizational Capacity

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Capacity building, an integral aspect of organizational leadership, involves investing in the right people for the right roles, and implementing the necessary systems to optimize their success. In this course, students will learn theories and best practices having to do with leadership’s role in building and maintaining organizational capacity.

Project Management

  
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    PM-8010CAGS - Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The student will create a comprehensive research project that seeks to create a unique solution to a stated, real or hypothetical defined topic approved by the faculty. Research scope and definitions must be declared before the specific approved project can commence. Students will be assessed on demonstrated proficiency in designed assignments, which will culminate into a final research project.
  
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    PM-7020 - Developing High Performing Teams in a Project Management Environment

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course focuses on developing high performing teams to mitigate people problems in the project management environment. Students will be assessed on their ability to research, conceptualize, and mitigate human capital problems and issues.
  
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    PM-7016 - Managerial Budgets and Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Budgets provide an accurate measurement of the authorized work physically accomplished plus a status of the management’s budget for the completed work. This course presents the budgeting for a project and one tool that can be applied to measure project progress: the Earned Value Management technique. Earned value will be examined in this course as an effective technique to manage project budgets and express project progress.
  
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    PM-7012 - Multiple Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides strategies from industries responsible for management of multiple projects. Students will utilize multi-project management tools, techniques and methods need to successfully manage allocated resources across various projects. Students will be evaluated on response to discussion questions, subject matter related to the activity and evaluated based on written research papers.
  
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    PM-7008 - Project Monitoring and Control

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course students will explore the components of project monitoring and control measures to identify variances from the project plan. Students will assess project monitoring and the controls to be applied from a more theoretical viewpoint. The student will be researching theorists and key implementers in the field. Corrective actions will be formulated in a final assessment project.
  
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    PM-7004 - Project Risk Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course examines project risk management planning strategies. students will identify, analyze, and suggest responses to processes regarding monitoring and control. Students will be evaluated on response to discussion questions, subject matter related to the activity and evaluated based on written research papers.
  
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    PM-7000 - Project Procurement Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Doctoral Learners will examine strategies and materials necessary for a project team to manage procurement processes and issues. The course covers procurement and contracting for products, services, and personnel, as well as legal and ethical implications of procurement and contracting. Students should be able to apply procurement management principles and PMBOK (5th ed) processes to actual contracts and procurement contexts, as well as applying organizational theories to project procurement research.
  
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    PM-6020 - Management, Leadership and Team Building in the Project and Program Environment

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will explore techniques and skills that can mitigate human resource problems in the project and program environment. Such problems can cause delays, erode quality, increase costs, and result in high levels of stress for everyone on the project team. This course will introduce and investigate soft skills utilized in management, leadership, and team building that can be applied to manage tough human resource issues. Students will examine concepts of leadership and organizational behavior to promote their effectiveness as both project leaders and project managers. Integration of tools and technology such as social media and management of virtual and multi-cultural teams will also be studied.
  
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    PM-6016 - Earned Value Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Earned Value is the accurate measurement of the authorized work physically accomplished plus management’s budget for the completed work. This course presents the Earned Value technique which has been around for decades. It is discussed in this course as an effective technique to manage projects.
  
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    PM-6012 - Management of Multiple Projects

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course presents proven methods from a cross-section of industries for the management of a portfolio of projects. It will demonstrate multi-project management tools, techniques and methods. You will learn how successful businesses manage projects, how they set up multiple project management processes, what technologies are effective and how they allocate resources across various projects.
  
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    PM-6008 - Project Monitoring and Control

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore the components of project monitoring and control measures in project management. Students will monitor project progress in order to identify variances from the initial project plan. Corrective actions will be identified in order to meet project objectives. Students will identify and quantify control concepts, pricing and estimating methodologies in order to incorporate these concepts in to a Quality Management Plan for the project.
  
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    PM-6004 - Project Risk Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Project risk is an uncertain event or condition that can have either a positive or negative effect on a project’s objectives. This course includes the processes concerned with conducting project risk management planning, identification, analysis, mitigation and monitoring and control.
  
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    PM-6000 - Project Procurement Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Project Procurement Management includes the processes necessary to acquire the materials necessary for the project team to perform their mission. This course includes contract management and the change control processes required to administer contracts or purchase orders issued by project team members.
  
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    PM-4000 - Introduction to Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides an introduction to the discipline of project management. The undergraduate student will explore techniques that managers apply to complete projects on schedule, within budgeted cost, and according to a specified scope. The student will be applying theory and knowledge based on the PMBOK® Guide to Project Management Body of Knowledge. Students will examine the operational framework of project management relating to the specified project and its life-cycle phases. The Signature Assignment for this course will be the development of a Project Management Office (PMO) plan.

Psychology

  
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    LS-3010 - Foundations for Undergraduate Study

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an orientation to Northcentral University and to the essential skills needed to pursue an undergraduate degree. Academic skills, such as academic integrity, time management, and effective use of the Northcentral Library are introduced. Students will develop the ability to locate, evaluate, use information in the context of academic and professional activities, and use APA form and style in professional communication. This course highlights personal goals, strengths, and overcoming challenges, and provides a roadmap for students to navigate their way towards completion of their educational aspirations.
  
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    PSY-8605 - Evidence-Based Practice in Addictions and Rehabilitation

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course provides an overview of evidence-based practices essential to effective treatment, rehabilitation and sustained recovery for substance use disorders. Emphasized are models of addiction (including biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives); diagnostic criteria and its relevance to treatment; patient placement criteria; and modes and models of addiction treatment. Included is an exploration of clinical trials leading to the use of empirical evidence in treatment modalities and recognition of the significance of maintaining fidelity in the implementation of evidence-based practices. Other considerations include the assessment and treatment of co-occurring disorders, family involvement, multicultural factors and the importance of individualizing care as a means toward relapse prevention and sustained recovery.
  
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    PSY-8604 - Addiction Treatment and Special Populations

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course examines the diverse intervention approaches that have been used effectively in special populations, including women, the elderly, veterans, LGBT, and ethnic minorities. Focus will be placed on phases of the therapeutic process from intake/assessment to treatment planning and implementation. The heterogeneity of and within the special populations and the need to ensure appropriate care is provided to this individuals will be emphasized.
  
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    PSY-8603 - Advanced Clinical Supervision: Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Prerequisites: PSY -8602  

    This course explores the advanced skills and expanded knowledge areas necessary for continued development as a clinical supervisor. Topics include the development of a personal model of clinical supervision and its application via practice and/or current supervisory responsibilities. Practical issues that arise in supervision including managing crises and legal dilemmas will be emphasized. The development of leadership and other skills necessary to enhance one’s performance in mentoring counselors also will be addressed.
  
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    PSY-8602 - Clinical Supervision

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course provides an overview of topics essential to becoming an effective clinical supervisor of addiction counselors. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of tools and skills necessary to mentor counselors in the development of skills through a positive mentoring relationship. Other topics include the significance of the supervisory relationship, the understanding of models and methods of supervision, as well as relevant issues such as cultural diversity, counselor assessment and ethical responsibilities.
  
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    PSY-8601 - Case Management Approaches and Methods

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this course, students will focus on methods and approaches to case management as well as the multifaceted role of the modern case manager. Students will examine the functions of case management within the therapeutic process and identify the responsibilities of case management in evaluation and follow-up in a variety of treatment settings.
  
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    PSY-8600 - Integrated Theories of Addiction and Rehabilitation

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course is designed for the advanced practitioner and those with a working history in addiction treatment interested in learning more about integrated theories of addiction and rehabilitation. Topics to be covered include the history of alcohol and other drug treatment, models and theories of addiction, and neurobiology of addiction with specific focus on a variety of evidenced based approaches. Highlights include a focus on how substances affect the users, the resulting impairments, the recovery process, and how the integration of addiction theory and practices that support rehabilitation.
  
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    PSY-8505 - Mental Health and the Courts

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    The intersection of mental health policy, practice, and the law is complicated. In this course the student will be exposed to psycho-legal concepts such as those involved in the use of behavioral health evidence in courts, therapeutic jurisprudence, juvenile delinquency, child abuse and neglect, competency to stand trial, and personal rights.
  
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    PSY-8504 - Psychology and Finance

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course will examine how human psychology influences economic conditions and socio-economic institutions. The student will explore psychological factors, such as fairness, corruption, bad faith, money illusion, confidence, and stories, and how these factors influence the global economy. The student will also examine biases related to financial decision making and economic risk taking as these relate to status-seeking behavior.
  
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    PSY-8503 - Evidence-Based Treatments

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Evidence-based treatments refer to mental and behavioral health interventions for which systematic and empirical research is provided to assess the effectiveness of treatments. Students in this course will be asked to analyze and evaluate treatment approaches in regards to moral, empirical, and political criteria. Students will also be expected to evaluate and synthesize considerations for “good practice” in the absence of empirical evidence and to appraise and select appropriate instruments for evaluation. An overview of the evidence-based culture will also be explored.
  
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    PSY-8502 - Comparative Analysis of Psychotherapies

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this course the student will analyze the complicated issues associated with various contemporary therapies used by behavioral health practitioners. The student will be exposed to core and peripheral elements of the most commonly used approaches to treating minor and major mental illnesses and behavioral challenges. Methods of therapeutic accountability, clinical feedback and outcome monitoring which can be used across all therapeutic approaches will also be examined.
  
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    PSY-8501 - Mental Health Administration and Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Effective development, integration, and maintenance of a mental health organization are necessary in today’s market in order to have sustainability. How ideas will be transformed into reality will be reviewed and how an organization adapts to change will also be discussed. Students in this course will be asked to analyze strategic management factors such as how to best create a multidisciplinary team that will coordinate roles within the organization and maximize supervisory capabilities.
  
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    PSY-8500 - Mental Health Service Policy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Mental health encompasses an extensive and diverse range of services in the United States including substance abuse, school-based mental health, and mental health in the criminal justice system. This course will explore these services as well as approaches to identifying persons who suffer from mental illness, treatment settings, and research and evaluation of mental health policy.
  
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    PSY-8406 - Multivariate Statistical Analysis

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    The central theme of this course is the general linear statistical model and its derivative methods including multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), MANCOVA, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, linear modeling, path analysis and structural equation modeling. The course covers theoretical, computational, and interpretive issues of multivariate exploratory and inferential statistical procedures.
  
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    PSY-8404 - Consulting in Business, Education, and Health

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Consulting in schools, businesses, and mental health settings requires and array of personal skills, knowledge and information, and techniques. In this course you will learn how to develop personal skills and understanding of consulting to give you a basis to develop a successful consulting program.
  
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    PSY-8403 - Organizational Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course provides an overview of theory, research and practice related to the implementation and management of change in organizations. The role of culture, climate and leadership in planned organizational change is explored.
  
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    PSY-8402 - Work Motivation and Attitudes

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course focuses on contemporary theories and research surrounding job attitudes and motivation in the workplace. Strategies for increasing motivation and improving job attitudes, as well as important issues such as diversity, workplace misbehavior, and stress are addressed.
  
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    PSY-8401 - Leadership and Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this course, students will gain an appreciation of leadership and how it differs from management. Students will approach these topics through a review of literature. Self-assessment on key leadership scales will help the student understand their own profile as leaders, as well as gain additional insight in the characteristics of leaders.
  
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    PSY-8400 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This overview course focuses on the wide variety of topics found within the field of I/O psychology such as employee selection, training and development, job analysis, and motivation. Key theories, recent research and innovative applications within the field will be addressed.
  
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    PSY-8334 - Death and Dying

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this course, students will consider the psychological aspects of death and dying in modern society. Students will also explore attitudes toward death and theories related to the stages of death and dying, along with coping strategies for dealing with impending death, the aftermath of suicide, and end of life decisions. This course will also address assisted dying, grief, and survivor’s guilt.
  
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    PSY-8333 - Psychological Practice in Gerontology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course addresses the psychologist’s role in elder care management. Topics to be covered include an overview of psychological assessment and evaluation as applied to aging adults as well as therapeutic techniques and intervention related to elderly on individual, group and family level. Ethical considerations in geropsychology practice also will be discussed. Areas of practice such as clinical settings, government and nonprofit agencies, nursing homes, also will be reviewed.
  
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    PSY-8332 - Multicultural Perspectives of Aging

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this course, students will examine multicultural influences on the aging process on individuals. Topics to be covered include attitudes toward aging and well-being, social support, elder care, and end of life issues. Gender and ethnic differences in aging experiences will be discussed. Concerns related to special populations also will be addressed.
  
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    PSY-8331 - Aging, Families, and Elder Care

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this course, students will examine the gamut of helping services known as elder care. These services include basic assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs), to rehabilitation care, aging in place, familial caregiving, long-term care and hospice. This course focuses on the concepts, theories and strategies related to the care of older adults. Common concerns related to elder care needs will be discussed including the emotional strains families may face. A key component of the course will be identification of caregiver strategies, including support groups, respite care and other community resources.
  
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    PSY-8330 - Mental Health and Aging

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this course, students will review psychological aging and mental health, an area often misunderstood by older adults, family, caregivers and medical professionals. Common mental health issues such as depression, addiction and anxiety faced by older adults will be addressed. Neurological changes, including Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and dementia spectrum disorders, will be examined. Symptoms, assessment, and treatment options for mental health issues in this population are complicated with the presence of other physical problems and associated medications and treatment. Other topics to discuss include risk factors for non-medication compliance, elderly neglect and abuse in residential homes, loneliness and cross culture differences in coping strategies and social support.
  
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    PSY-8325 - Gender and Cultural Considerations in Disaster Trauma and Response

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course explores diverse populations and their experiences and reactions to various types of trauma. Among the topics addressed are culturally appropriate and effective community interventions designed to foster resilience.
  
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    PSY-8324 - Trauma-informed Interventions with Disaster and Trauma Survivors

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Students will examine the theories and techniques related to crisis intervention. The roles, responsibilities, and functions of crisis counselors as a member of an interdisciplinary emergency management response team during a local, regional, or national crisis, disaster or other trauma-causing event also will be reviewed. Note: This is not a counseling course.
  
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    PSY-8323 - Trauma-informed Assessment, Risk, and Diagnosis

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course provides a foundation for the assessment and diagnosis of acute and long-term symptoms associated with traumatic experience. Various measurements of post-traumatic stress will be examined. Attention will also be given to identifying individuals at continued risk for traumatic stress.
  
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    PSY-8322 - Disaster, Terrorism, and Mass Violence: Impacts on Mental Health

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course reviews human-caused trauma and disaster, including mass shootings, bombings, riots, exposure to biohazards, and acts of terrorism, and their impacts on mental health. It will examine survivor and responder reactions and needs, and introduce strategies to assist individuals in moving on with their lives post-traumatic events.
  
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    PSY-8320 - Psychology of Traumatic Stress

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    Students will identify the different types of trauma and disaster and their antecedents. The neurological implications of traumatic stress will be explored. The history of the field of trauma psychology will be examined. Trauma research and treatment also will be reviewed.
  
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    PSY-8310 - Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8


    This course takes an evaluative look at complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) from a health psychology perspective. Evidence-based practice in the application of CAM methods to managing physical health needs will be explored. Strategies and techniques leading to successful treatment outcomes will be assessed. Usage of CAM methods for diverse populations including children, older adults, ethnic groups and other minority populations will be examined.

    Image description: Complementary and Alternative Medicine can take many forms. This image depicts an open journal with flowers, a lemon, and various spices and herbs. Certain herbs and spices have medicinal properties and have been used over the years to treat various ailments. Some will also keep a journal to notate treatment plans and which treatments did or did not work. This information is helpful for working with your doctor and others on your care team.

  
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    PSY-8309 - Eating Disorders and Obesity

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course surveys topics related to eating disorders and obesity, including etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Specific focus is given to the dispositional, social, and cultural factors associated with the development and maintenance of disordered eating patterns. Implications for psychological and physical health are examined.
  
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    PSY-8308 - Behavioral Nutrition

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Behavioral nutrition investigates the relationship between healthy diet and behavior. In this course, you will learn about what constitutes good nutrition, malnutrition, and under-nutrition. The physiological impact of nutrition will be examined. Psychosocial factors influencing nutrition and behavior will be reviewed.
  
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    PSY-8307 - Psychosocial Factors in Health

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The body-mind connection is a well-researched topic in the field of medicine and psychology. This course will help the student become aware of the body of research surrounding the impact of behavior, personality, and social factors on physical health. Further, it will explore how diversity issues, such as gender, age, and ethnocultural factors influence health-related behaviors.
  
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    PSY-8306 - Health Psychology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This doctoral-level course examines psychological influences on physical health and well-being. Key topics to be explored include health behavior change, diversity in healthcare, social support, chronic illness management, illness prevention, and wellness. The role of health psychologists will be discussed, including how they contribute to healthcare policy.
  
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    PSY-8206 - Sex, Sexuality, and Power Dynamics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this course, students will address topics such as domestic and sexual violence, sexual exploitation, sexual assault, rape and sexual abuse, human sex trafficking, prostitution, and pornography. The course will also examine the work in prevention and treatment, and highlight ways to empower survivors of sexual trauma. Public policy efforts to prevent sexual violence and address sexual trauma will be explored.
  
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    PSY-8205 - Psychology and the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Population

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This is a doctoral-level course focuses on advanced issues in psychotherapy and counseling with individuals who identify as Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual (GLB). This course also explores clinical models, family function and dynamics, ethical principles, and counseling techniques.
  
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    PSY-8204 - Psychological Aspects of Gender Variance

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This is a doctoral-level course with a comprehensive focus on ethical, appropriate psychotherapy and counseling across the lifespan with individuals that identify as gender variant. The course addresses clinical competencies, theoretical approaches to understanding gender variance, and treatment modalities with both children and adults. The course assumes a basic working knowledge of the current thinking on transgender issues.
  
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    PSY-8203 - Psychology of Gender

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    In this doctoral-level course, students will think critically about the way in which gender is understood from various perspectives. Students will explore the difference between sex and gender, and how gender impacts relationships and communication. Changing gender roles and gender roles in diverse cultures will also be important points. Students will have the opportunity to learn about these topics, as well as to apply and to reflect on these important issues.
  
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    PSY-8201 - Dynamics of Family Interaction

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course examines the theoretical and empirical contributions to the understanding of marital and family systems. The specific focus of the course is on the processes and dynamics of interaction within these relationships. The course will include content on the history of family life, diverse family types, roles and rules in families, family problems and family health, and rituals in family life. Conceptualizations of effective functioning in marriages and families will be studied and various factors that impact marital and family systems will be addressed.
  
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    PSY-8200 - Sexual Issues

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This is a doctoral-level comprehensive course focusing on physiological, psychological, and social cultural variables associated with sexual identity, psychological, cultural, and biological aspects of human sexuality, including an overview of psychosexual development, cultural and individual variations, gender identities and roles, and legal aspects.
  
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    PSY-8141 - Human Communication- Interviewing Skills

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students in this course will learn, practice, and develop core communication skills that are essential to interviewing in the helping professions. As this is a practice-oriented course, students who plan to use interviewing techniques in their current or future professions will gain experience in essential communication skills such as listening to clients, clarifying concerns, and facilitating appropriate actions. Those students will benefit most from this course who are either currently in a helping profession capacity where interviewing is applied, or who are able to practice their skills as interns or in other settings.
  
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    PSY-8140 - Community Psychology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course focuses on the theories, research findings, and applications of community psychology. Relationships between environmental conditions and culture and the development of the health and well-being of all members of a community are also examined. Students will examine key concepts, principles, and values of community psychology. The theoretical frameworks in peer-reviewed research will be examined, assessed, and synthesized.
  
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    PSY-8139 - Positive Psychology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course examines the historical and theoretical perspectives of positive psychology. The emphasis includes a scientific investigation of the latest research of positive psychology focusing on subjective well-being, positive emotions, strengths, resilience, post-traumatic growth, grit, and growth mindset. You will explore how positive psychology is being implemented in the home, workplace, education, and in clinical settings. You will evaluate the challenges faced by the positive psychology field and the potential evolution of this branch of psychology.
 

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