NCU Catalog - April 2018 
    
    Jan 31, 2023  
NCU Catalog - April 2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Codes and Course Length

Course Codes

NCU course codes include a course prefix and number. The course prefix identifies the content area of a course and the number identifies the course-level (e.g., Undergraduate, Master’s. etc.). Courses in this catalog section are list by School and content area in numerical order.

Example: The course prefix “ACC” indicates Accounting content

Course Numbering

Course numbering used at NCU is as follows:

Undergraduate 1000 to 4999
Master’s 5000 to 6999;
5000-8 to 6999-8
Doctoral and Advance Studies Certificates 7000 to 8999;
7000-8 to 8999-8
Doctoral Sequence Courses

9000 to 9799; 
9901A-C to 9904A-C

Course Length

Course length varies by course and program. Please refer to the course listing in this catalog to determine the length of a specific course.

 

Public Administration

  
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    PUB-8010CAGS - Public Administration Capstone Project

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The student will create a comprehensive research project that seeks to create a unique solution to a stated real or hypothetical defined topic approved by the faculty member. Research scope and definitions must be declared before the specific approved project can commence. Students will be assessed on demonstrated proficiency in designed assignments, which will culminate into a final research project.
  
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    PUB-7017 - Public Personnel Administration

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides important concepts related to human resources management in the public sector. Elements of the course include an understanding of civil service environment, protections, and other issues such as social change and globalization, and how matters surrounding human resources relate to broader themes in advancing human capital in the public sector. As a doctoral level course, students will be expected to incorporate current research literature into their assignments as a foundation for dissertation work or future research. Course content applies to researcher and practitioner perspectives.
  
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    PUB-7014 - The U.S. Federal Government

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore the organization, function, operation, and politics of the United States Federal government. Students will examine the foundations and historical events of federalism by assessing each of the three major branches of the federal system. Students will examine the issues of liberty and civil rights as they relate to the political process and the implementation of policies within the political process. Finally, students will evaluate the role of campaigns, media, and interest groups to determine how they influence the government.
  
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    PUB-7012 - Technology in Public Administration

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students examine the nature of information technology, its influence on public sector organizations and functions, and major issues stemming from information technology. The nature of information technology is better understood through an analysis of the external environment, or operating context, such as e-democracy, e-participation, and e-governance. This analysis is then complemented by an evaluation of the internal environment such as leadership, organizational change, and enterprise architecture. Finally, students will evaluate major functional issues within the information technology domain such as e-procurement, e-commerce, human resources, privacy, and information security.
  
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    PUB-7005 - Public Budgeting and Finance

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Prerequisites: Fundamental requirement in General Management

    Budgets and financial resources are integral components of most management decisions, especially within governmental entities. This doctoral level course will examine budget formulation, implementation and execution systems, including local government financial statements; use of modern financial management technology, analysis and recommendation of improvements in governmental financial management. Budgeting and finance at the federal level differ from processes at the state, county, and local levels. Students will evaluate both managerial practices and politics that form budgeting and finance at the federal, state, and local levels of government.
  
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    PUB-7004 - Urban and Regional Planning

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Prerequisites: Fundamental requirement in General Management

    This is a course in urban planning with an integrated overview of the theory, processes, and practices of modern strategic planning in the public and nonprofit sectors. Students will explore contemporary strategies, techniques, and tactics with a focus on the application of theory and public orientation of policy formulation process at the local level of government. This course is designed to provide a conceptual framework and practical skills that will help students understand the role of public officials and the impact of public opinion within the broader scope of institutional planning and decision-making.
  
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    PUB-7002 - Administrative Law

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The framers deliberately structured a Constitutional Republic to constrain the potential abuse of power through federalism and checks and balances. The growth of agencies and administrative law stress these notions of the limited role of government. In this course, students develop practical knowledge about administrative agencies and laws that govern their behavior; examine administrative law in the context of accountability to prevent governmental abuse of power; and apply critical thinking in a variety of case studies.
  
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    PUB-7000 - Public Administration

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides a platform to synthesize the discipline of public administration from a conceptual and theoretical perspective within the context of historical, political, legislative, and judicial perspectives and developments within America. The course allows students to evaluate the concepts and theoretical components of public administration and the role of public administrators within an interorganizational context. Finally, the course provides considerations for students to evaluate resource management, policy analysis and implementation; and to defend ethical considerations in relation to transparency, accountability, and diversity within the context of historical public administration practice reforms.
  
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    PUB-5009 - Public Program Evaluation

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Program evaluation is the art and science of developing justifiable answers to a variety of questions dealing with beneficiaries and goals. Evaluators work with program staff and stakeholders to clarify a program’s operational theory and goals, develop information to help tailor an intervention to a specific audience, document a program’s specific activities, reach, and outcomes, and develop information about the impact of a program on a specific topic. Course activities will be focused on giving students hands-on experience with specific research skills and tools required for effective program evaluation. Individual written assignments will build on each other over the course of the semester, culminating in a final presentation documenting your evaluation plan for a real-world project.
  
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    PUB-5007 - Quality Management in Public Administration

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Quality management provides governmental structures with foundational measures and approaches for better public service delivery. In this course, students are provided the opportunity to examine the principles and methods for implementing an effective Total Quality Management system in a governmental environment. Students are provided a variety of planning methods to design, manage, and sustain such a system. By differentiating between strategic planning and operational planning, students will define a vision of quality improvement and insures those efforts are appropriate and stay on track.
  
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    PUB-5005 - Public Budgeting and Finance

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Fiscal policy and the allocation of public funding are significant tools that presidents, governors, mayors, and legislative bodies at all levels of government manage, thus impacting the lives of all Americans. The current political and economic environment provides a unique opportunity to view budget policy as spending demands and revenue growth diverge. The major focus of this course is to acquaint students with the administration and management of public funds for organizations in the public sector. Organizational units could be at local, state, or federal levels, as well as in the private sector in the form of nonprofit organizations.
  
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    PUB-5002 - Government and the Public Interest

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is designed to deal with the issues of lobbying at the national and local levels. Student will examine the ways that government officials influence public opinion and the informative role that government plays on major social issues, using publicity, advertising, press agency, public affairs, issues management, investor relations, and development. Finally, the course offers the student to chance to develop a comprehensive public relations campaign.
  
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    PUB-5000 - Introduction to Public Administration

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is designed as a broad introduction to the field of public administration. Students will examine the discipline and practice from within the political, social, and organizational settings in which public administrators operate. Major emphasis is placed on examining issues at the federal, state and local levels with particular focus on how government functions.

Reading Education

  
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    RDG-5005 - Assessment of Reading and Writing Proficiency for PK12

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will learn to use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing instruction. Formative and summative reading and writing assessment instruments will be explored in terms of their purposes, strengths, and limitations. Current information on state as well as national movements to standardize or individualize assessments will be researched. Means of communication of assessment results to students, parents, caregivers, colleagues and administrators will be explored.
  
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    RDG-5004 - Reading Comprehension Instruction and Development: Skills and Strategies for PK12

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will gain an understanding of reading comprehension including such strategies used in activating background knowledge, questioning, clarifying, summarizing, predicting, connecting, visualizing, analyzing, adjusting, and self-monitoring. Levels of meaning in text and textual structures in narrative and expository writing will be studied. There will be an exploration of critical-thinking skills and behaviors as well as strategies for effective studying. Research on eye movements and fluency and automaticity in oral and silent reading will be examined. Finally, there will be an exploration of the wide range of resources for children’s and adolescent literature, including recently published fiction and nonfiction, as well as electronic texts and non-print materials.
  
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    RDG-5003 - Vocabulary Instruction and Development for PK12

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will explore the derivations, structure, semantics, context, pragmatics, and instruction of words in English. Research and practice in developing levels of academic vocabulary will be presented. Students will explore in the principles in developing word consciousness, sight vocabulary, spelling proficiency, and developing a larger, more complex vocabulary in speaking, reading, and writing.
  
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    RDG-5002 - The English Language: Etymology, Elements, and Implications for Instruction

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will receive an overview of the influences of history, geography, and culture on the development of the English language as well as information on its grammar, including phonology, morphology, syntax, phonetics, semantics, and pragmatics. There will be an examination of best practices in phonics instruction that support cognitive, cultural and linguistic differences in readers and writers.
  
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    RDG-5001 - Essential Elements of Elementary Reading and Writing Instruction

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will study the essential elements of elementary (K-8) reading and writing instruction. Students will explore evidence-based best practices in phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Students will learn how comprehensive literacy lessons that include reading, writing, and oral language processes can improve literacy learning. Finally, students will use these best practices in literacy instruction to develop a comprehensive lesson that addresses individual student needs and keeps students motivated and engaged.
  
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    RDG-5000 - Theoretical and Research Foundations of Language and Literacy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will study the theoretical and research foundation of language and literacy. Students will explore current research concerning language and literacy and how that research can guide current literacy instruction and educational practice. Students will use research to inform others and promote continuous professional development.

Special Education

  
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    SE-7006 - Teaching Strategies in Special Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore research-based best-practice teaching strategies for students with disabilities. Topics will include instructional methods and materials, teacher collaborative activities, Response to Intervention (RTI), and Individual Education Plan (IEP) design, implementation, and modification.
  
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    SE-7005 - Law in Special Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will focus on various legal issues facing special educators and administrators. Components will include investigations of specific court cases, federal mandates, case studies, and application opportunities. Student identification, service delivery options, appropriate educational services, and family rights and privacy issues are explored. How to research court case rulings that pertain to specific states and how to locate current information on legal issues is included to assist administrators of special education programs. Preparing for due process hearings and following procedural due process are also covered.
  
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    SE-7004 - Characteristics of Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will focus on understanding research-based characteristics of students with intellectual disabilities. Major emphasis will be placed on the assessment and identification of intellectual disabilities among at-risk students, Individual Education Plan (IEP) development and progress monitoring for students with intellectual disabilities, understanding the educational and behavioral needs of students with intellectual disabilities, and providing effective instructional practices for students with intellectual disabilities in both inclusive and special education classrooms.
  
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    SE-7003 - Characteristics of Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will focus on understanding research-based characteristics of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders. Major emphasis will be placed on: 1) the assessment and identification of emotional and/or behavioral disorders among at-risk students, 2) Individual Education Plan  (IEP) development and progress monitoring for students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders, 3) understanding the learning needs of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders, 4) applying strategies to address students’ emotional and/or behavioral disorders, and 5) providing effective instructional practices for students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders in both inclusive and special education classrooms. 
  
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    SE-7002 - Characteristics of Student with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will focus on understanding research-based characteristics of students with specific learning disabilities. Major emphasis will be placed on the assessment and identification of specific learning disabilities among at-risk students, Individual Education Plan (IEP) development and progress monitoring for students with specific learning disabilities, understanding the educational and behavioral needs of students with specific learning disabilities, and providing effective instructional practices for students with specific learning disabilities in both inclusive and special education classrooms.
  
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    SE-7001 - Assessment in Special Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will investigate the assessment and placement process of children experiencing school performance difficulties. Students will explore individuals involved in the assessment process, testing procedures, results, and the analysis and synthesis of data to develop interpretations, report summaries, and defend educational placement decisions.
  
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    SE-7000 - Introduction to the Exceptional Student

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will gain current in-depth research perspectives related to the instructional and administrative responsibilities of educating students with disabilities. Topics will include the history of special education, identification of students with special needs, provisions of the IDEA/IDEIA, legal issues, inclusion, transitions, classroom modifications, instructional strategies, assessment procedures, service delivery models, and educational programming.
  
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    SE-5006 - Teaching Strategies in Special Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will work with teaching strategies that are useful in assisting students with mild disabilities. The latest information on Response to Intervention (RtI) is covered, with information on practical applications to promote success in the classroom. Participants will develop an understanding of how to monitor individualized education programs and select instructional strategies to improve student performance. Analyzing, selecting, and adapting strategies for students with special needs will be addressed. The ability to differentiate instruction utilizing current methods of embedded and explicit strategy instruction will also be explored.
  
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    SE-5005 - Special Education Law

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will focus on the basics of the law and legal issues facing special educators and administrators. Topics include: The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, discipline, appropriate educational decisions, procedural due process, and privacy issues.
  
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    SE-5004 - Instructing Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will focus on instructing students with intellectual disabilities. Major emphasis will be placed on the assessment and identification of intellectual disabilities among at-risk students, Individual Education Plan (IEP) development and progress monitoring for students with intellectual disabilities, understanding the educational and behavioral needs of students with intellectual disabilities, and providing effective instructional practices for students with intellectual disabilities in both inclusive and special education classrooms.
  
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    SE-5003 - Instructing Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will focus on instructing students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders. Major emphasis will be placed on: 1) the assessment and identification of emotional and/or behavioral disorders among at-risk students, 2) Individual Education Plan (IEP) development and progress monitoring for students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders, 3) understanding the learning needs of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders, 4) applying strategies to address students’ emotional and/or behavioral disorders, and 5) providing effective instructional practices for students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders in both inclusive and special education classrooms. 
  
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    SE-5002 - Instructing Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will focus on instructing students with specific learning disabilities. Based on the common educational and behavioral needs of students with specific learning disabilities, you will examine relevant accommodations, modifications, and differentiation of instruction as well as monitoring student progress. The context of this course includes both inclusive and separated educational settings.
  
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    SE-5001 - Assessment in Special Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will investigate the processes involved in identifying students who may need special education services. You will examine formal and informal assessments used to determine student needs and eligibility for services, including applying assessment data to the development of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and/or Section 504 plans when necessary. Your work will be guided by regulations and policies of relevant federal, state, and local education authorities.
  
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    SE-5000 - Introduction to Students with Disabilities

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will gain current perspectives related to the instructional and administrative responsibilities of educating students with disabilities. Topics will include the history of special education, identification of students with special needs, provisions of the IDEA/IDEIA, legal issues, inclusion, transitions, classroom modifications, instructional strategies, assessment procedures, service delivery models, and educational programming.

Sports Management

  
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    SM-7118 - Financial Administration of Sports Facilities and Programs

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students are presented with basic financial principles and concepts in interscholastic athletic programs. Course activities include marketing, revenue management, documentation and technological practices, and strategies for long-range planning. Course mastery is demonstrated by developing a fundraising plan as a sports administrator.
  
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    SM-7115 - Facility Management and Programming

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will explore the principles, responsibilities, and issues involved with the management of athletic facilities. Activities include personnel and risk management, merchandising, quality assurance, and issues affecting the community. Additional components include environmental issues, and factors in operating facilities and sporting events.
  
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    SM-7112 - Advising the Student Athlete

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students explore the role and function of the academic advisors in the lives of students-athletes. Students will examine existing student-athlete retention programs in college and universities to understand their components and effectiveness. Recognizing learning differences in students with learning disabilities or disorders will also be explored in this course. The goal of this course will be to find academic services and counseling programs to help students that are in need, reach their greatest potential.
  
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    SM-7109 - Sport Compliance

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will study rules and regulations associated with intercollegiate athletics at the NCAA I, II, and III level, NAIA, and NJCAA. Students will examine key components of compliance including recruiting, eligibility, amateurism, and financial aid. Topics include: strategies used by institutions across the country to maintain institutional control, the differences and similarities of the 5 different groups (NCAA I, II, III, NAIA, and NJCAA), and the groups which govern NCAA legislation.
  
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    SM-7106 - Legal Aspects of Equity in Intercollegiate Athletics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Within this course, doctoral students will study the Title IX’s structure and requirements applied to intramural, recreation, interscholastic, and intercollegiate athletic programs. The philosophical, historical, and conceptual account of this law will be explored and its effects upon these programs. Students will examine the historical account of the social, legislative, and judicial environments in which in which Title IX has grown to maturity in the last three decades. Students will also explore how current trends in campus demographics have affected sports programs throughout the nation. An experiential learning model will be utilized whereby students will be able to use their personal experiences when researching the legal aspects concerning equity in interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics as we know it today.
  
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    SM-7103 - Intercollegiate Sport Governance

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will gain the knowledge of governance and politics of sport organizations that govern intercollegiate athletics. Students will analyze how people involved in governance set the tone of an organization and how individual sport bodies fit into the greater industry. Emphasis will be placed upon the development of a working knowledge of what organizations do and what their purpose is in the administration of an intercollegiate department.
  
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    SM-7100 - Development of Human Resource Strategies in Intercollegiate Athletics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students are presented with the latest human resource strategies to successfully address everyday problems that may arise with coaches, staff, and personnel of an intercollegiate athletic department. Students develop a working knowledge of human resource policy and procedure in complex organizations and how this may affect the employees that they supervise. Topics addressed include recruitment, hiring, retention, planning, Title IX compliance, and related management strategies.
  
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    SM-5012 - Issues in Athletic Administration

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will learn the role of contemporary issues in athletic administration and how these issues affect those who desire to become professionals within interscholastic athletic administration. This course provides a basic overview of sociology and sports, including an analysis of sports’ impact on society, society’s impact on sports, and the governance of sports programs.
  
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    SM-5010 - Marketing in Athletics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, student will learn how the dynamics of marketing and consumer behavior apply to sports organizations is essential for those who desire to become professionals within interscholastic athletics. Beginning with an overview of basic marketing theories and concepts, Students will gain insight into the ethics of sport marketing, fundraising, and sponsorship while analyzing leagues, teams, and events. Students will apply this insight by developing a marketing plan for an athletic program.
  
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    SM-5006 - Sports Governance and Policy Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will learn the governance and policy development of interscholastic athletic programs. The roles of the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA), the state athletic/activity associations, and federal/state guidelines will be examined. Local board of education governance and the structure of local athletic programs will be reviewed. The course will also address sample athletic program philosophies and departmental organizational structure and procedures.
  
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    SM-5004 - Ethics in Sports

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The purpose of this Master’s level course is to promote critical examination of ethical issues and moral dilemmas that are inherently found within interscholastic sports settings. Students will explore, research, and analyze ethics and morality in interscholastic sports settings. A series of written assignments will provide reflective opportunities for learners to develop self-awareness and knowledge of how to become character driven, effective leaders. Students will develop an understanding of character based educational athletics and will be challenged to examine personal philosophies, clarify values, and refine moral reasoning skills relative to interscholastic athletics administration.
  
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    SM-5002 - Legal Aspects in Athletics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will develop the knowledge, skills, and awareness of the law and how legal precedence relates to interscholastic sport settings. Students will discuss, explore, analyze, and create solutions to specific dilemmas found in athletics at the high school level. An emphasis will be placed on current events and practical applications.
  
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    SM-5000 - Leadership and Administration of Athletic Programs

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will explore the methods, principles, and decision-making responsibilities of a school athletic administrator. Through readings and independent activities, students will have the opportunity to equip themselves with skills in leadership, management, communication, and curriculum development. Students will apply these skills by taking on the role of a school athletic director and tackling some of the problems involved in the development and supervision of school athletic programs and events.

Strategic Knowledge Studies

  
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    SKS-7001 - Doctoral Comprehensive Strategic Knowledge Studies

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will analyze and apply knowledge in 12 business areas necessary to address a wide variety of business-related situations. The focus of the course is demonstrating core proficiencies in the following business areas: Marketing, Business Finance, Accounting, Management, Legal Environment of Business, Economics, Business Ethics, Global Dimensions of Business, Information Systems, Quantitative Techniques and Statistics, Leadership, and Business Applications. The intent is not to introduce these core business concepts, but rather to verify a graduate-level threshold competency within each. The course includes a comprehensive case study that will allow students to demonstrate their competency within all 12 professional component areas.
  
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    SKS-5001 - Comprehensive Strategic Knowledge Studies

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students have the opportunity to gain foundational knowledge in fifteen different areas important to business and management including accounting, finance, law, ethics, marketing, global business, information systems, research, leadership, strategic management, operations management, human resources, organizational behavior, and micro and macroeconomics. This course serves as a foundation for success in future courses in the MBA program.
  
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    SKS-4001 - Comprehensive Strategic Knowledge Studies

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this capstone course, students will have the opportunity to run a multi-million dollar global company for 8 years in a simulation designed to give the students real-world business situations that require strategic decisions. The students will examine business concepts from a global perspective, include strategic planning, business trends, global laws and ethics, operations management in a global business, and global economics. Students will reflect on their business decisions and apply different business concepts as they relate to the global business environment.

Technology & Innovation Management

  
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    TIM-8650 - Project Management Analytics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course represents the merging of project management with data.  Students will study how big data, knowledge management, data analytics, and data mining can aid project managers not only in current projects but in preparing and planning for future project success.
  
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    TIM-8640 - Program & Portfolio Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This doctoral course provides strategies from industries responsible for management of multiple projects. Learners will utilize multi-project management tools, techniques and methods need to successfully manage allocated resources across various projects. Learners will be evaluated on response to discussion questions, subject matter related to the activity and evaluated based on written research papers.
  
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    TIM-8630 - Managing Risk in Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This doctoral course examines project risk management planning strategies. Students will identify, analyze, and suggest responses to processes regarding monitoring and control. Students will be evaluated on response to discussion questions, subject matter related to the activity and evaluated based on written research papers.
  
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    TIM-8620 - Project Management Systems & Technology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced examination of the systems, technologies, and tools used to monitor and ensure project success.
  
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    TIM-8610 - Leadership in Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Highly skilled teams are necessary for planning and implementing innovative new ideas and projects. This course is an advanced examination of leadership and human capital management as they relate to project management.
  
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    TIM-8601 - IT Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced examination of the primary processes, deliverables, and knowledge groups involved in managing the development of new technologies and ideas. Students will also evaluate current research trends in project management.  The course is aligned to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) version 5.
  
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    TIM-8530 - Big Data Integration

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced study of theories and concepts related to Big Data Integration. Some course concepts include an introduction to Big Data analytics, tools, and recent technologies. Students will also be introduced to current research trends in the area of Big Data and potential future problems in this area which they explore.
  
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    TIM-8520 - Inferential Statistics and Predictive Analytics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced examination of tools, techniques, theories, and technologies for analyzing past events and discovering patterns that can help predict future events.
  
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    TIM-8510 - Data Visualization

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    New data types and data visualization requirements are emerging often. In this course, students will explore ever-expanding data visualization requirements and techniques for presenting data in the most effective way.
  
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    TIM-8501 - Quantitative Methods for Data Analytics and Business Intelligence

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced examination of quantitative methods for organizational researchers. Students will also study new and emerging topics in statistics and quantitative analysis.
  
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    TIM-8440 - Knowledge Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced study of theories and concepts related to capturing, storing, managing, recalling, and reusing organizational knowledge.
  
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    TIM-8430 - Systems Analysis & Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced study of theories and concepts related to designing and implementing technology systems to address business problems.
  
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    TIM-8420 - Data Warehousing & Decision Support

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced study of the theories and trends related to creating and managing enterprise data warehouses, as well as using those repositories to inform business decisions.
  
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    TIM-8410 - Cloud Computing

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will study trends and recent developments in Cloud Computing and begin determining what the next great innovation will be in this area of computing.
  
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    TIM-8350 - Critical Infrastructure Protection, Information Warfare, & Cyber Terrorism

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine critical infrastructure protection, information warfare, cyber terrarium, and evolving U.S. policy response to attacks. The primary focus is cyber terrorism which is an emerging mode of information warfare that exploits civilian and military systems’ inherent vulnerabilities. Cyber terrorism’s broad reach affects national and global security. This course will focus on the human and technological aspects of cyber terrorism.
  
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    TIM-8340 - Secure Software Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Security is often left out of the early stages of software development.  This course is an advanced examination of software engineering for the security professional.
  
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    TIM-8330 - Advanced Risk Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students in this course will review information assurance and security concepts that impact the information technology (IT) industry as whole.  The challenges associated with assessing and implementing computer security are a global issue. In this course, an overview of the subject of information technology system security will be presented including the nature of risk and its application to information system security, threats, and vulnerabilities. The student will be required to strive for the highest levels of knowledge in the field of risk management and information assurance.
  
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    TIM-8320 - Contingency Planning & Disaster Recovery

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001 (9/11), brought organizational disaster recovery strategy into the spotlight. This course provides students with the background knowledge and skills they need to develop effective disaster prevention and recovery capabilities in various organizations. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles of disaster recovery planning for physical security consideration, host applications, and network security measures.
  
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    TIM-8310 - Cyber Forensics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will be introduced to the field of advanced cyber forensics. Students will review various tools, techniques, and steps needed for a successful forensic investigation. In addition, students will examine various legal regulations that impact the collection of data, the importance of federal rules of evidence, and the critical requirement of evidence admissibility in a court of law.
  
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    TIM-8301 - Cybersecurity Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an overview of security principles for the executive security professional. Students will study advanced and emerging topics in security management.
  
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    TIM-8230 - Quantitative Methods for Engineering

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced examination and critical analysis of statistical and quantitative methods used in engineering research.
  
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    TIM-8220 - Engineering Law

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Innovative new ideas are often brought to fruition by talented engineers.  Protecting those ideas requires close attention to laws regarding intellectual property; and engineers are bound by regulations that help ensure the safety of their work.  In this course, students will study the legal implications of innovation and engineering. In addition students will learn to use the patent system as a research tool in developing new technologies.
  
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    TIM-8210 - Quality Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Managing innovation requires care to ensure that new ideas are developed and implemented well. In this course, students will study emerging knowledge in total quality management and apply this knowledge specifically to the task of developing and implementing innovative ideas.
  
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    TIM-8150 - Artificial Intelligence

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8


     

    Artificial intelligence is becoming more and more useful in helping solve everyday problems. Intelligent agents and natural language processing have become commonplace in the early 21st century. In this course, students will study emerging trends in artificial intelligence research and attempt to predict its impact on everyday computing.

  
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    TIM-8140 - Software Engineering

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore emerging issues in software engineering. Emphasis will be placed on trends in mobile development, architecture & design, testing, security and the empirical analysis of software systems.
  
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    TIM-8130 - Data Mining

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced examination of theories and concepts related to the extraction of meaningful and non-obvious information from structured and unstructured data.
  
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    TIM-8120 - Distributed Systems

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    With the advent of mobile technologies and super high speed networks, distributed computing is becoming ever more commonplace, allowing computers to coordinate their efforts over vast distances.  In this course, students will study the emerging technologies and techniques for using them in facilitating distributed computing.
  
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    TIM-8110 - Programming Languages & Algorithms

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    New programming languages and algorithms are being proposed every day to try to solve problems faster, use less storage, and make programmers’ and researchers’ jobs easier. This course is an advanced study of the practical and theoretical principles behind the design, analysis, and implementation of algorithms and programming languages for research and professional practice.
  
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    TIM-8101 - Principles of Computer Science

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course introduces the foundations of computer science for students without prior experience in the subject.  Included is an overview of mathematics concepts for computer science, programming in a high-level language, and algorithm design and analysis. 
  
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    TIM-7245 - Directed Constructive Research

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will apply their knowledge of research design and methodology in engineering, computing, and the sciences to produce a draft of their first formal dissertation deliverable: the prospectus.
  
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    TIM-7240 - Constructive Research Design & Methodology for Technology Leaders

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course is an in-depth introduction to methods and measurements used in designing and testing artifacts (e.g., theories, algorithms, procedures, systems, hardware) for research in computing, engineering and the sciences.
  
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    TIM-7235 - Directed Qualitative Research

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will apply their knowledge of qualitative research design and methodology to produce a draft of their first formal dissertation deliverable: the prospectus.
  
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    TIM-7230 - Qualitative Research Design & Methodology for Technology Leaders

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course is an in-depth introduction to qualitative methods for studying human behavior including grounded theory, narrative analysis, ethnography, mixed methods, and case studies.
  
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    TIM-7225 - Directed Quantitative Research

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will apply their knowledge of quantitative research design and methodology to produce a draft of their first formal dissertation deliverable: the prospectus.
  
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    TIM-7220 - Quantitative Research Design & Methodology for Technology Leaders

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course provides technology leaders with the skills essential for designing quantitative research studies, analyzing the data collected in these studies, and interpreting the results of data analyses.  Scholar-practitioners will explore designs and statistical techniques to use with their envisioned dissertation research.
  
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    TIM-7210 - Introduction to Research Design & Methodology for Technology Leaders

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course is an introduction to the skills and tools necessary for the design, implementation, and critique of research in disciplines related to technology and innovation.  The scholar-practitioner will examine the formal research process carefully, with an emphasis on practical applications and skill development.
  
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    TIM-7200 - Scholarly Communication for Technology Leaders

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    It is important for technology scholars to be able to communicate effectively with diverse audiences in varied situations.  This course is designed to aid professionals in ensuring their message is delivered and understood.  Topics include both professional and scholarly communication useful to the innovative technology leader.
  
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    TIM-7100 - Statistics with Technology Applications

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 12

    This course serves as an extensive exploration of statistics for the technology leader.  Included is an advanced examination of statistical analyses commonly used for research in information systems and technology.  Students will gain the skills required to plan, conduct, report, and interpret quantitative statistical analyses.
  
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    TIM-7040 - Technology Policy & Strategy

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced examination of the theories, concepts, and strategies for managing technology policies and implementing innovative technology strategies in organizations.
  
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    TIM-7030 - Managing Risk, Security, & Privacy in Information Systems

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    A strategic technology professional should be ever mindful of how an organization’s technology introduces inherent risk to the organization.  This course is an advanced study of risk management and other critical considerations in high-tech organizations.
  
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    TIM-7020 - Databases & Business Intelligence

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an advanced examination of concepts and research trends in databases and business intelligence.
  
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    TIM-7010 - Computer Networks & Mobile Computing

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore emerging issues in computer network design and management. Of particular attention will be topics on how mobile computing has changed the way networks are designed and managed.
  
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    TIM-7001 - Changing Times: Leading Technology & Innovation in the 21st Century

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Visionary leaders can help change an organization and bring about new innovations.  In this course, students will practice being those visionaries and being champions for new technologies and positive change in public and private organizations.
  
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    TIM-6640 - Program & Portfolio Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course presents proven methods from a cross-section of industries for the management of a portfolio of projects. It will demonstrate multi-project management tools, techniques and methods. You will learn how successful businesses manage projects, how they set up multiple project management processes, what technologies are effective and how they allocate resources across various projects.
  
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    TIM-6630 - Managing Risk in Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Project risk is an uncertain event or condition that can have either a positive or negative effect on a project’s objectives. This course includes the processes concerned with conducting project risk management planning, identification, analysis, mitigation, monitoring, and control.
  
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    TIM-6620 - Project Management Systems & Technology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Project managers have a wide range of tools available to them. This course is an introduction to information systems and other technologies that can aid the project manager in ensuring the project’s success.
  
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    TIM-6610 - Leadership in Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will explore techniques and skills that can mitigate human resource problems in the project and program environment. Such problems can cause delays, erode quality, increase costs, and result in high levels of stress for everyone on the project team. This course will introduce and investigate soft skills utilized in management, leadership, and team building that can be applied to manage tough human resource issues. Students will examine concepts of leadership and organizational behavior to promote their effectiveness as both project leaders and project managers. Integration of tools and technology such as social media and management of virtual and multi-cultural teams will also be studied.
  
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    TIM-6601 - IT Project Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides an overview of the primary processes, deliverables, and knowledge groups involved in project management.  Students will practice project management specifically as it relates to managing and developing new technologies and ideas.  The course is aligned to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) version 5.
  
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    TIM-6530 - Big Data Integration

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an introduction to the theories, concepts, and tools related to big data. Topics covered include an introduction to big data analytics, knowledge and data discovery, secure data management, and big data in enterprise systems.
  
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    TIM-6520 - Inferential Statistics and Predictive Analysis

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Although no one has a crystal ball that can truly see the future, data analysts do have many techniques and tools that allow accurate prediction of future events based on prior trends.  In this course, students will study learn to analyze patterns in data that can help predict the future.
  
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    TIM-6510 - Data Visualization

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Representing data in a way that is useful for decision-makers is important.  This course is an introduction to best practices in presenting data to decision-makers in the most readily-consumable and usable forms possible.
 

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