NCU Catalog - April 2018 
    
    Dec 08, 2021  
NCU Catalog - April 2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Codes and Course Length

Course Codes

NCU course codes include a course prefix and number. The course prefix identifies the content area of a course and the number identifies the course-level (e.g., Undergraduate, Master’s. etc.). Courses in this catalog section are list by School and content area in numerical order.

Example: The course prefix “ACC” indicates Accounting content

Course Numbering

Course numbering used at NCU is as follows:

Undergraduate 1000 to 4999
Master’s 5000 to 6999;
5000-8 to 6999-8
Doctoral and Advance Studies Certificates 7000 to 8999;
7000-8 to 8999-8
Doctoral Sequence Courses

9000 to 9799; 
9901A-C to 9904A-C

Course Length

Course length varies by course and program. Please refer to the course listing in this catalog to determine the length of a specific course.

 

Homeland Security

  
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    HS-7014 - Strategy, Resiliency, and Coping with Fear

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course students will have an opportunity to gain a conceptual understanding of the meanings of strategy, national interests, elements of power, and asymmetric threats. Students also will explore the meaning of the concept of resiliency as well as how terrorists use fear to their advantage. An understanding of these concepts will aid any homeland security professional in performing their duties and protecting the populace.
  
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    HS-7013 - Intelligence and Law Enforcement

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will take a critical look at the integration of intelligence operations and law enforcement in the realm of homeland security. Topics will also include the composition of the U.S. intelligence community, roles of various U.S. intelligence agencies, and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community. The course provides the knowledge necessary to utilize strategic intelligence effectively in the law enforcement and public safety realm.
  
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    HS-7010 - Transportation Security

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will closely examine transportation networks with regard to the security demands now required. The course assignments include the exploration of the threats to each industry and measures needed to secure the networks from a domestic and global perspective. Regulatory agencies, both domestic and international, will be subjects of study as well as national and international agreements.
  
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    HS-7004 - Local Emergency Management and Civil Preparedness

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will analyze the operations and preparedness of local emergency management systems and their ability to respond to natural and manmade disasters. Students will learn how the National Incident Management System functions and use it to plan the use of emergency response organizations. Students will explain and assess local community capabilities to maintain the safety of their populations and the processes through which local emergency response agencies can request assistance.
  
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    HS-7000 - Homeland Security and Terrorism

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course serves as an introduction to the study of homeland security and will provide an overview of the practical discipline, including readings on the various government agencies involved in different aspects of homeland security. The course will also include an overview of the terrorist threat faced today and an examination of how that threat came into being.
  
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    HS-6020 - Maritime Terrorism

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the primary national and international strategies that shape the response to maritime terrorism. The various types of threats, ships and containers, and weapons available to terrorists provide a complex environment for students to assess through the study of the maritime industry and government actions to safeguard that industry.
  
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    HS-6003 - Homeland Security Risk Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the major issues essential for understanding homeland security and its foundation in all-hazard emergency management. Assignments provide the students with the opportunity to examine the use of risk analysis in homeland security operations. Students will examine risk analysis processes in situations from mitigation to recovery.
  
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    HS-6002 - International Crime and Terrorism

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will address the linkage of terrorism and criminal activity and how law enforcement can respond to them. The central thrust of this course is to examine how and why global crime and terrorism have merged and the implications for political, law enforcement, and military institutions. Included in this exploration are the global drug trade, human trafficking, and the associated criminal activities such as money laundering and arms deals.
  
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    HS-6001 - Homeland Security Transportation

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course serves as an introduction to transportation systems and provides students an opportunity to analyze the actions necessary to create adequate security inside the network of intermodal operations. The course includes the exploration of the actual threat to the industry with a concentration on appropriate counter terrorism measures within each component from domestic and global perspectives. The course also includes a review of emerging technology in the field of transportation security
  
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    HS-5101 - Introduction to Homeland Security

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course introduces historical aspects of homeland security and changes in government responses after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Students will gain an understanding of homeland security topics relevant to today’s international and domestic environments. Responses from local, state, and federal entities responsible for Homeland Security as well as non-profits and corporations involved in coordinating their efforts with each other are elements of the course.

Human Resources Management

  
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    HRM-7008 - Legal Issues in Human Resources Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This doctoral course looks at the multiple levels of employment, including management, full-time employees, part-time employees, temporary employees, and contracted employees based on the passage and interpretation of laws, whether at the federal, state, or local level. Policies such as employment-at-will, right to work, or termination, and other regulations can change with an act of Congress or a state legislature.
  
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    HRM-7007 - Cultural Issues

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course demonstrates the uniqueness of culture and its impact on all aspects of organizational operations. This includes such aspects as diversity, global transitioning, accommodations, and cross-national teamwork. Twenty-first century managers must be astutely aware of how cultural issues impact work and ability to gain competitive advantage.
  
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    HRM-7004 - Supervising in the 21st Century

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Prerequisites: *Fundamental requirement in General Management

    This course examines supervisory concepts, laws, regulations and HRM practices used in the 21st Century. Students will be assessed on responses to subject matter-related activities and written research papers.
  
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    HRM-7003 - Labor Relations

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore all aspects of labor relations from a human resources perspective. This will include the history, structure, politics, processes, and relationships associated with bargaining units (unions). Students will examine how unions can change attitudes and behaviors of management and employees, as well as the benefits and challenges to working in a human resources position in a unionized environment.
  
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    HRM-7002 - Compensation and Benefits

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course explores the concepts of extrinsic and intrinsic compensation in the management of today’s diverse and global workforce. The decisions made in these areas, related to compensation and benefits at the Executive and the employee level, can directly impact the strategic nature and direction of the organization.
  
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    HRM-7000 - Human Resources Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will focus on the development of the human resource function in organizations. While understanding and management of human behavior within organizations are necessary for optimal organizational effectiveness and individual performance, strategic planning to achieve organizational goals through the human resource function is recognized.
  
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    HRM-5008 - Legal Issues in Human Resources Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is designed to enable the student/Human Resources Manager to recognize and analyze potential legal implications of common workplace situations. This course will help to understand and evaluate current trends and issues in employment law and to apply this knowledge in a way that effectively manages risk in the employment relationship. In this course, considerations are addressed regarding the employment relationship, employment laws and HR policies resolving employment disputes and current/future trends in employment and Human Resources laws.
  
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    HRM-5004 - Supervisory Concepts and Practices

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Through a blend of theory, practice, and skill development, this course explores the supervisory concepts, practices, challenges, and limitations that affect management in today’s business environment. To operate successfully in this changing environment, organizations need supervisors with the managerial skills and creativity to turn uncertainty into opportunity, think strategically, lead change initiatives, motivate employees, encourage a positive work environment, analyze and address the challenges of managing a diverse talented workforce, and effectively communicate with both internal and external stakeholders. This course shows how to apply the principles of supervisory management to recognize and take advantage of these opportunities.
  
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    HRM-5003 - Labor Relations

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine the history and development of labor relations, the structure of union organizations, and the process of negotiations and contract administration. The course begins by establishing the present state of the labor movement and models the decision process that can be used to decide whether or not to participate in organizing a union. Also covered are the laws and regulations governing collective bargaining, risk management, impasse resolution, employees’ safety, and contract administration. Students will conclude the course by examining global issues with regards to unionization and how international labor organizations can affect a domestic company and its employees.
  
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    HRM-5002 - Compensation Issues in Human Resources Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course explores four strategic choices in managing compensation: 1) concerns for internal consistency, 2) external competitiveness, 3) employee contributions, and 4) administration. Each of these strategic decisions is examined in terms of the major compensation issues requiring resolution. The examination is made in the context of related theories, research, and state-of-the-art practices that can guide compensation decision making. Additionally, the course will examine employee morale, performance, mobility path, policies and training and learning opportunities as non-wage areas of concern in regards to managing employee compensation.
  
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    HRM-5001 - Recruitment and Human Resources Information Systems

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course presents a comprehensive staffing model that identifies the key components of staffing, external influences, and staffing system management. Major areas covered are staffing models and company strategy, external influences (economic laws and regulations), staffing strategy and planning, job analysis, measurement, external and internal recruitment, external and internal selection, decision making, the final match, retention, and management of the staffing system. Emphasis is placed on staffing strategy and the importance of external selection in securing employees that will become productive members of the organization. This course also focuses on the integration of technology into core staffing functions.

Information Technology

  
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    TIM-6590 - Strategic Management of Data, Information, and Knowledge

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Using data, information, and knowledge to improve competitive position will be a key component in strategic planning in the 21st century.  In this course, students will integrate everything they have learned regarding data science into formulating strategic visions, strategies, goals, and objectives.

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

  
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    IOP-8404 - Consulting in Business, Education, and Health

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Consulting in businesses, schools, and mental health settings requires an array of personal skills, knowledge and information, and techniques. In this course you will learn how to develop the personal skills and understanding of consulting to give you a basis to develop a successful consulting program.
  
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    IOP-8400 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course focuses on how psychological principles are applied in work settings. Current models, theories, and research in Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology will be explored. The role of attitude and motivation, as well as group factors and leadership in forming a social context for work will also be addressed.
  
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    PSY-6429 - Capstone in I/O Psychology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The Capstone course in I/O Psychology is an opportunity to demonstrate a range of professional competencies and communication skills, reflecting the knowledge, critical thinking, sensitivity to ethics and diversity, and appreciation of research that has been acquired during the MS program. The Capstone course culminates in a review of the evidence based practices related to a specific issue of interest to the student in I/O Psychology.
  
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    PSY-6411 - Internship in I/O Psychology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students seeking a master’s degree in I/O psychology may opt to complete their degree by taking an internship in I/O psychology instead of the Capstone course. During the internship experience, students will meet weekly with their assigned NCU professor as well as their approved internship site supervisor to discuss their experiences. Weekly assignments include submission of required evaluations and preparation for the final theoretically grounded presentation summarizing the internship experience. Internship experiences are designed to guide candidates through specific standards-aligned experiences with resulting growth in competencies demonstrated through application in practice
  
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    PSY-5404 - Tests and Measurements in I/O

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course introduces students to the basic theories, applications, and issues of psychological testing and assessment. Students will review the historical, professional, and legal context of utilizing tests and measurements in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Specifically, students will explore the purpose, development, application, and evaluation of psychological tests as applied to employee selection, placement, and performance appraisal. Students will also examine special topics related to use of psychological tests in the workplace, including the merits of cognitive ability, personality, and vocational testing, technological advancements in testing, and the testing of special populations.
  
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    PSY-5403 - Personnel Selection and Recruitments

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, personnel recruitment and selection is introduced as an evidence-based practice aimed at identifying qualified candidates and encouraging them to apply for jobs with an organization.  The student will discover and understand the theories and principles of Industrial/Organizational Psychology (IO) that focus on personnel recruitment and selection.  Students will also evaluate the methodology, including the assessment tools and develop persuasive arguments about personnel recruitment and selection.  The goal of this course is to use a systematic approach of hiring and promoting qualified personnel.
  
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    PSY-5402 - Organizational Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course explores the role of the Organizational Development (OD) practitioner in supporting and/or leading change in individual, group, and organizational settings. In order to facilitate change so that it enhances productivity, students will learn about the evolution of organizational development, the process of change, and the many types and components appropriate in different OD situations. Student will also examine the principles, theories and ethics of organizational development and change. The goal of this course is for students to be able to both manage and implement interventions to remake the way an organization functions. 
  
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    PSY-5401 - Foundations in I/O Psychology

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course is an introduction to graduate studies in Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology. This area of psychology involves the application of psychological principles to work settings, which includes personnel selection, training and development, performance management, stress and motivation, work attitudes, leadership, teams, and work-life balance. Current models, history, ethical and legal concerns, and research in I/O Psychology will be explored. In addition, graduate-level skills—such as academic integrity, effective use of the Northcentral Library, comprehension of complex scholarly texts and research articles, and use of APA format and style in professional communication—are also introduced. Students will complete the course with a roadmap to navigate their way to completion of their educational aspirations.
  
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    PSY-5111 - Applied Statistics in I/O PSY

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, margin of error, and the visual representation of statistical data. The emphasis in this course is on developing a conceptual knowledge of how statistics are used in the setting of I/O Psychology. The student will learn about many of the commonly used statistical tests in psychological research such as t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, regression, and chi-square are along with their interpretation. Students will demonstrate analytical proficiency by creating and interpreting tables and graphs based on results of statistical tests in preparation for sharing presentations with stakeholders.

Instructional Design

  
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    ID-8250 - Advanced Simulations, Games, and Mobile Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will explore the design and development of simulations, games, and mobile learning. You will critique game theory and its relevance to the design of instructional and training solutions. You will also evaluate platforms for the design and delivery of gaming solutions as well as simulations and mobile learning. Based on this work, you will measure the effectiveness of such designs for various learning contexts and audiences. Finally, you will develop learning assets based on games, simulations, and mobile learning and share those assets in your portfolio.
  
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    ID-8210 - Theoretical Foundations of Instructional Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Theories are foundational to scholarly inquiry, and many theories impact the design and development of instructional and training solutions. In this course, you will dig deeper into relevant theories and hone your ability to both recognize the theoretical influences of existing solutions as well as select the appropriate theoretical foundation for new solutions. You will practice defending your design recommendations with consideration for the ethical, legal, and political factors that might influence the application of theory within the design and development of instructional and training solutions.
  
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    ID-8200 - Advanced Instructional Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course builds on your foundational knowledge of instructional design with advanced practice. You will recommend instructional and training solutions based on existing assessment and evaluation data, formulate procedures for collaborative design projects with diverse stakeholders, and categorize legal, ethical, and political influences on the design of contemporary instructional and training solutions. You will develop instructional materials, including multimedia learning assets that comply with professional practice of instructional design and development.
  
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    ID-8080 - Special Considerations in the Practice and Research of Instructional Design and Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will explore special considerations in the practice and research of instructional design and development. Such considerations include emerging models, theories, and technologies that can be applied to the design and delivery of instructional and training solutions for unique learning needs, contexts, and stakeholders. You will continue your examination of the ethical, legal, and political implications of these special considerations.
  
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    ID-8060 - Innovation in Learning Experiences

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Innovation is more than just doing things differently. In this course, you will determine the characteristics of innovation and specify what constitutes innovation across different learning experiences. Different contexts will be at different stages and levels of complexity within learning experience design, so what is innovative for one context may be routine in another context. As you learn about innovation, you will be able to predict the application of emerging processes and tools on innovation in the learning sciences and recommend opportunities for innovation within specific learning experiences.
  
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    ID-8040 - Evaluation of Design Processes and Products

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Design is iterative and should include feedback. This course will help you to hone your skills in securing such feedback – through evaluating both the processes and products of instructional design and development. You will examine relevant principles and theories of evaluation, conduct evaluations, and interpret the results of evaluations for diverse stakeholders. As you learn more about evaluating design processes and products, you will reflect on the ethical, legal, and political implications of evaluation.
  
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    ID-8030 - Collaboration in Design Practices and Products

    Semester Credits: 8 Weeks: 3

    This course will support your development of collaboration skills necessary in design and developing instructional and training solutions. You will also cultivate collaboration in the diverse stakeholders for the projects you are managing, including recommending the allocation of resources and estimating the return on investment. The course will continue your exploration of ethical, legal, and political considerations in project management and collaboration.
  
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    ID-8020 - Models and Heuristics of Instructional Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Heuristics are common approaches to completing tasks, even though those approaches lack direct alignment with a scholarly model. This course offers you the opportunity to distinguish heuristics and models and evaluate the ethical, legal, and political implications of each as you facilitate collaboration among diverse stakeholders. You will illustrate relationships between heuristics and models and justify your choices for various design projects.
  
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    ID-7080 - Special Considerations for the ID Leader

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course supports your exploration of special considerations faced by leaders of complex instructional design and development projects. These considerations will include the ethical, legal, and political factors on which you have reflected throughout your program. These considerations will also include leadership theories and practices for emerging models, theories, and technologies used in the projects and organizations in which you lead. You will also consider how evidence of your leadership skills can be included in your digital portfolio.
  
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    ID-7040 - Development Models and Evaluation of Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    There are many ways to develop instructional and training solutions as well as to evaluate those designs and products. In this course, you will examine multiple models for developing products based on designs, so the focus of this course is more about development and evaluation than design itself. By the end of the course, you will be able to validate design effectiveness through multiple methods, formulate strategies to address resistance to iterative design and evaluation, maximize effectiveness of complex design processes and products among diverse stakeholders, select technologies for prototype iteration for instructional and training solutions, and produce research-based recommendations for evaluation of instructional and training solutions.
  
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    ID-7020 - Leading and Managing Complex Design Projects

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will demonstrate advanced expertise in leading and managing complex design projects with diverse stakeholders. Toward this goal, you will determine needed resources, create timelines, overhaul procedures based on feedback, consider strategies to address legal, ethical, and political factors, and evaluate technologies that support leading and managing complex design and development projects.
  
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    ID-6000 - Instructional Design Capstone Experience

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will demonstrate your proficiency in designing, developing, and evaluating instructional and training solutions as well as managing such projects from initiation to closure. In addition, you will appraise the value of artifacts you have curated throughout your program in comparison with not only the program learning outcomes, but also with professional competencies and standards recognized across the industry.
  
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    ID-5090 - Project Management for Instructional Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course prepares you for the broad role instructional designers assume in most organizations. You will create commonly used documents for the initiation, planning, and closure phases of instructional design projects. You will also examine strategies for stakeholder communication and change management, including ethical, legal, and political implications throughout instructional design projects. 
  
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    ID-5080 - Special Considerations in Design Practice

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course enables you to explore special considerations in design practice. Such special considerations include emerging models, theories, and technologies that can be applied to the design and delivery of instructional and training solutions for unique learning needs, contexts, and stakeholders. You will continue your examination of the ethical, legal, and political implications of these special considerations, and this examination will be included as an artifact in your digital portfolio.
  
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    ID-5070 - Development Models and Evaluation of Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will illustrate different development models and use specified methods for evaluating the design and development of instructional and training solutions. This process includes recommending revisions based on user feedback and evaluating the ethical, legal, and political factors impacting iterative designs and evaluations of instructional and training solutions. You will use your learning in this course to evaluate the artifacts you have curated in your digital portfolio.
  
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    ID-5060 - Authoring Tools for Design and Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course allows you to evaluate authoring tools for the design and development of instructional and training solutions. You will investigate the benefits and limitations of different authoring tools and use these tools to sketch storyboards and produce authentic products for instruction and training. Throughout the course, you will examine ethical, legal, and political influences on the selection and use of authoring tools. You will continue to showcase your developing competencies through your digital portfolio.
  
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    ID-5050 - Development of Learning Materials

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will support your skills in developing both digital and print-based learning materials. You will evaluate factors that impact the effectiveness of learning materials for various learning contexts and audiences, including consideration for cultural competencies within materials. You will also evaluate evidence for developing learning materials that align with measureable goals and use multiple tools to illustrate the delivery of learning materials, such as diagraming storyboards. Evidence of the effectiveness of these materials for specific needs, contexts, and learners will be assembled in your growing portfolio.
  
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    ID-5040 - Design Principles for Multimedia Learning

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will explore different design principles for multimedia learning. You will not only evaluate factors that impact the effectiveness of multimedia for various learning contexts and audiences, you will also measure the effectiveness of such multimedia learning. You will then be able to provide for stakeholders methods for selecting and designing multimedia as well as ways to optimize existing multimedia solutions. Based on your learning, you will use different tools to design your own multimedia assets.
  
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    ID-5030 - Assessment of Learning

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The assessment of learning serves multiple purposes. In this course, you will explore assessment for learning, assessment of learning, and assessment as learning. At the core of assessment is data, and you will practice illustrating and using data to justify design recommendations for diverse stakeholders. As you work through the assessment cycle – from initial design through use of resulting data – you will consider the influences of ethical, legal, and political factors. You will also consider how your digital portfolio illustrates assessment for, of, and as learning by correlating some of your own learning artifacts with professional standards and competencies.
  
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    ID-5020 - Analyzing Needs, Contexts, and Learners

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, you will have the opportunity to demonstrate expertise with analyses of needs, contexts, and learners. You will examine ways to assess whether organizational needs can be met with instructional and training solutions as well as the ethical, legal, and political factors that influence these decisions and any subsequent solutions. You will practice analyzing potential learners and their learning and performance contexts, illustrating the data from your analyses, and justifying your recommendations to stakeholders. Finally, you will also begin work on your digital portfolio to which you will contribute evidence of the competencies you develop throughout the program.
  
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    ID-5010 - Applying Theory to Instructional Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Theories are foundational to scholarly inquiry, and many theories impact the design and development of instructional and training solutions. In this course, you will investigate some of these theoretical influences, particularly learning theories, and critique the effectiveness of different solutions according to various theories. Application of theory is also influenced by ethical, legal, and political factors that will be explored within the context of design and development of instructional and training solutions. From the perspectives of both learners and organizations, you will also review the use of digital portfolios to demonstrate specific competencies. 
  
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    ID-5000 - Fundamentals of Instructional Design

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This introductory course provides the opportunity for you to demonstrate proficiency in the fundamentals of instructional design (ID). Relevant topics at an introductory level include comparing ID models, interpreting necessary analyses, exploring principles and theories relevant to learning and ID across diverse communities of practice, and analyzing the influences of ethical, legal, and political trends on designing instructional and training solutions.

Instructional Leadership

  
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    IL-7002 - Leader as Community Advocate

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Instructional leaders must forge relationships with stakeholders in the community to build effective learning organizations. In this doctoral course, students will evaluate the skills necessary to engage stakeholders in partnerships that enhance educational operations at all levels. Students will discuss methods to develop professional learning communities and evaluate the theories and research related to learning communities and instructional leadership.
  
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    IL-7001 - Leader as Advocate and Decision Maker

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will utilize various research-based leadership decision-making concepts and supervisory processes to advance teacher development and instructional practice.  Emphasis will be on the educational leader as a decision-maker, supervisor, and teacher advocate to support student achievement.  Additional topics will involve perceptions of leadership, instructional strategies and support, professional development, and collaboration.
     
  
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    IL-7000 - The Culture of Learning

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, doctoral students will explore ways of creating a culture of learning while engaging in instructional leadership tasks. Through course activities, students will explore topics including technology integration, philosophically sound curriculum decision-making, visionary leadership traits, and curriculum management.
  
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    IL-5002 - Instructional Leader as Community Conduit

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will investigate diverse leadership approaches to effective community engagement. Mastery is attained by creating a needs assessment to evaluate the strength of family, school, and community partnerships. Topics include: Professional Learning Communities, public relations, mission and vision, and instructional leadership roles and responsibilities.
  
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    IL-5001 - Instructional Leader as Advocate and Decision Maker

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students examine the role of instructional leader as that of advocate and decision maker. The importance of this particular role is grounded in the realization that the instructional leader articulates the vision that reflects the mission, core values, beliefs, and purpose of the educational enterprise. Additionally, the instructional leader’s role as advocate is to support the development and maintenance of high standards of performance and achievement. As decision maker and standard bearer for the enterprise, the instructional leader models the way and leads by example.
  
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    IL-5000 - Instructional Leader as Creator of Learning Culture

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students explore the knowledge, skill sets and behaviors that enable instructional leaders to establish and sustain professional learning cultures. Students will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge base per curriculum and its function(s) in educational settings. Students pursuing a specialization in instructional leadership will take this as their first course.

International Business

  
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    IB-7017 - International Business Law & Environment

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course covers the principles, scope and basic mechanism of international law, development and practices. The impacts of international relations and the legal environment on global business will also be examined. The course incorporates major cases of emerging disputes and dispute resolution among nations over such issues as intellectual property rights, labor and trade subsidy policies. Students will be assessed for their critical thinking and the theoretical applications through research oriented assignments.
  
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    IB-7016 - International Business Strategic Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The purpose of this course is to address the strategic management decisions of multinational corporations (MNCs) to enhance success in a global economy. Students will evaluate decisions-making skills and situations faced by managers of MNCs to meet changes in global business environments. The course examines global strategy, structures, and global strategic management knowledge.
  
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    IB-7013 - Global Marketing Environment

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine specific issues of social and cultural environments in the context of global marketing. Global marketing research and product launches are differentiated when entering international markets and when conducting marketing operations globally as opposed to domestically. Attention is focused on complex problem-solving techniques through an examination of culture and customer differences in different parts of the world. The purpose of this course is also to provide a new learning experience for global marketing professionals who need new methods to develop product design, implement comprehensive marketing brand, and plan strategies throughout the world. Students will be assessed their critical thinking and practical applications through research-oriented assignments.
  
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    IB-7012 - Global Economic Environment

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this doctoral course, students will explore international economic and trade theories and the role of global corporations. The global economic environment continues to pose major challenges; therefore, it is increasingly important to understand principles of international economic theory and international economic and financial governance institutions. Students will be assessed for their critical thinking and the theoretical applications to resolve complex research issues, and problems existed in the global economic environment.
  
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    IB-7002 - International Business Environments

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This doctoral course requires students to examine the impacts of economic, social, ethical, and political changes of different countries on global business. The emphasis is on developing higher-level thinking skills with an ability to critically evaluate, and explore, differences in conducting business in different international markets. Students are assessed for their critical thinking skills to resolve complex research issues and problems. Students will develop decision-making-skills required for managers to conduct business in different international markets.
  
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    IB-5017 - International Business Law

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course covers the principles underlying the legal environment of global business. In addition to identifying the current legal rules and regulations affecting businesses, this course presents insights into new developments and trends that will greatly affect future transactions on a global scale.
  
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    IB-5016 - Global Business Strategic Management

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course examines the strategic management of multinational corporations (MNCs),and outlines Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) trends and its economic determinants. In this course, students will appraise international business strategies that MNCs have used in emerging economies and challenges they confront in different regions by using real life case studies. The course will also identify factors contributing to foreign debt crisis and its prevention.
  
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    IB-5014 - Cultural Environment of International Business

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course examines the social, political, economic, technological and infrastructural complexities of operating in foreign cultures. The course is primarily focused on exploring the management of cross-cultural organizational relationships in the current global environment. Course assignments are weighted in the correspondence of these relationships, thus challenging your critical thinking. Textbook cases, scholarly research, videos, and relevant internet resources would be used to cultivate your understanding and interpretation of international business concepts and events.
  
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    IB-5013 - International Marketing

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course examines the issues involved in entering global markets and conducting marketing activities. Specific issues include evaluating opportunities in foreign markets, developing and adapting marketing strategies to specific national market’s needs, and coordinating strategies across markets. Students will diagnose the real-world experiences of global corporations using case studies and up-to-date knowledge from the textbook and relevant Internet resources.
  
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    IB-5012 - International Economics

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Managing in the international economic environment continues to pose major challenges; therefore, it is increasingly important to understand how the complex economic linkages can impact a country’s economy. This course covers international economic topics such as absolute versus comparative advantage, trade policies, international trade and economic growth, exchanges rates, and open economy monetary policy.

International Education

  
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    IE-7021 - Global Perspectives on Ethical Issues

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will address ethical issues confronting education from a global perspective, including both comparative and transnational points of view. It will address cross-border issues such as educational inequality, the role of culture, ethics in teaching, as well as how technology, economics and conflict impact ethics in education. Finally, the course will address ethical issues for teachers and educational administrators.
  
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    IE-7017 - International Education Concepts and Theory

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students in this Doctoral level course will explore that underpin education systems around the world, including the cultural and historical bases of these systems and the global spread of educational trends. Alternative theories and definitions of development as expressed in international education institutions will be evaluated. Students will be required to consider the challenges of reform and unique practices in international contexts. In addition, students will integrate an understanding of diverse educational perspectives through the evaluation of worldwide educational systems.
  
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    IE-7013 - Globalization and Educational Change

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine cross-cultural efforts to effect positive global educational change. Students will also explore theories of globalization as well as practices that are effecting positive global educational change. In particular, this course looks at international education policy to solidify students’ knowledge of globalization and its impact on international education. Students will also have the opportunity to explore the impacts of globalization on the education systems at home.
  
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    IE-7009 - Education in Conflict and Emergencies

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this doctoral level course, students will examine the theoretical underpinnings and practical challenges of education in difficult circumstances - in the context of conflict, emergencies and in a post-conflict environment. This includes the exploration of frameworks and strategies used today by education systems as well as international organizations and NGOs that often provide such services. Students will also explore education as a development strategy, including three overarching concepts: education as protection, education as a humanitarian response, and education as post-conflict reconstruction. This course also explores the impact that conflict has on formal systems of education, and the provision of education for refugees. Students are also introduced to key strategies and techniques that are frequently cited and used by educational planners delivering education in difficult situations. In conclusion, students are asked to conduct their own research to develop a deeper understanding of education in difficult circumstances.
  
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    IE-7007 - International Education Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore theory and practice to inform leaders in education. Students are introduced to institutions involved with the education of diverse communities as well as educational development in diverse global settings. Students will focus on building leadership skills in international education with a special emphasis on practices, strategies, and techniques that can be adapted to intercultural/multicultural contexts.
  
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    IE-7005 - International Organizations in Global Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will be introduced to global education organizations. Students will explore some of the diverse organizations that are engaged in international education, and learn about key guiding initiatives, policies and standards. This course also provides a good orientation for those who anticipate working with or for international organizations.
  
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    IE-7003 - Culture, Society, and Education in Comparative Perspective

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore and analyze international and comparative education, with a focus on methods, foundational theories, and resources specific to conducting international, educational research and exploring culture, society and education with a comparative perspective.
  
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    IE-7001 - Introduction to Global and Comparative Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This doctoral level course introduces learners to theories of comparative education, cross-national comparative analysis, global educational transfer and borrowing, and the relation between culture and education. Through this course, learners will begin to develop the knowledge, skills, and tools needed to be effective educators of global and comparative education. Students will understand the commonalities, differences, and connections between global and comparative education, and the meaning and significance of globalization in the field of education. Learners will comprehend, through reading and class assignments, the global dimensions of several crucial contemporary issues, including the hopes of global cooperation, and the complexity of educational accountability, authority, and professionalism. This course will underline the necessity of an interdisciplinary approach to understanding these complex issues.
  
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    IE-5021 - Education and National Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore the development of education nationally and internationally, and will make cross-national comparisons. Students will examine education in developed and emerging nations with a comparative perspective, including comparisons of school practice, teacher training, and policies that influence the provision of education, and challenges of educating citizens in transitional societies.
  
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    IE-5013 - Globalization and Educational Change

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore the theories and practices to effect positive global educational change. With a focus on pre-primary, primary and secondary education, students will examine practices that reflect how globalization is impacting learning and teaching. This includes gaining research practice in conducting interviews. Ultimately, students will be encouraged to act as change agents ready to examine education from a global perspective.
  
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    IE-5007 - Conflict Resolution in an International Context

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will examine the conceptual underpinnings of peace and conflict resolution and the paradigmatic models of conflict resolution. Substantive inquiry into a variety of peace building approaches on local, national, and global levels will also be explored. Students will develop the knowledge and appreciation of the theoretical, conceptual, and methodological breadth of the conflict resolution in an international context.
  
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    IE-5005 - International Organizations in Global Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will be introduced to global education organizations. Students will explore diverse organizations engaged in international education, ranging from the International Baccalaureate Program to UNESCO to NGOs, and examine key guiding initiatives and policies. 
  
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    IE-5003 - International Education Concepts and Theory

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Students will explore concepts and theories of education systems around the world, including the cultural and historical bases of these systems and the spread of educational trends across the globe. Alternative theories and definitions of development, as expressed in international education institutions, will be evaluated. Students will be required to consider the challenges of reform and unique practices in international contexts. In addition, students will integrate an understanding of diverse educational perspectives through the evaluation of worldwide educational systems.
  
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    IE-5001 - Introduction to Global and Comparative Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will develop the skills needed to be effective educators in a global society. Students will explore the connections between diverse education systems and evaluate various theories of comparative education. Topics include: comparative and global education, cross-national comparative analysis, global educational transfer and borrowing, and tools and instruments used in global education.

Leadership in Higher Education

  
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    LHE-7014 - Introduction to the Community College

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will gain knowledge of the history, nature, and purpose of American community colleges with emphasis on college funding, leadership, staffing, service learning and the importance of the mission, vision, and values. Mastery is attained through developing a strategic plan addressing a current/recent college challenge.
  
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    LHE-7013 - Community College Curriculum and Program Development

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will receive a general and introductory knowledge of curricular and leadership issues in a community college setting. Students will explore issues related to the community college curriculum relative to program development, student services, and leadership as well as assessment.
  
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    LHE-7012 - Strategic Planning & Institutional Effectiveness in Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore institutional and programmatic planning in tandem with the concern for institutional effectiveness. A major goal of this course will be to ensure an understanding of and appreciation for the range of approaches that can be taken to strategic planning, explicitly linking all strategies with the principles and best practices that support the drive toward institutional effectiveness.
  
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    LHE-7011 - Foundations of Higher Education Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    Higher education leadership occurs in an environment of ambiguity and constant change. Leaders must be able and willing to embrace uncertainty, continually learning, and develop a deep understanding of their core values. The course is designed to provide foundational grounding in the study of leadership theory and research, in higher education. Emphasis will be given to the practical application of higher education leadership theories and the academic and administrative roles of an institution of higher education. Students will explore best practices to uncover links that can be made to increase the value of higher education practices.
  
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    LHE-7010 - Current Trends and Topics in Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will explore areas of interest in higher education. Often these areas are new topics of special interest to higher education. At times, areas of higher education that are receiving attention nationally will be highlighted through this course. Students will work with instructors to create a self-directed study plan on a topic appropriate for doctoral level study.
  
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    LHE-7008 - Higher Education Finance

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will provide students with an overview of financial issues applicable to higher education in the United States. Students will engage a broad foundation of theory, practice, research, and policy of higher education economics. Topics will include societal investment in higher education, methods of finance, costs of higher education, and budgeting concepts.
  
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    LHE-7007 - Strategic Enrollment Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will learn the best principles and practices for leading recruitment, enrollment management, and institutional advancement efforts. Students will focus on effective enrollment management and leadership, recruitment, retention, institutional advancement, student service, targeted communication, applying technology to enrollment management and developing an institution-wide strategic enrollment process. Students have the opportunity to customize this course to their particular professional setting and goals.
  
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    LHE-7006 - Student Affairs Leadership

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will study the evolution and current practices of student affairs development, management, and leadership in higher education. Topics include: philosophical, historical, conceptual, and research foundations of the profession; cultural and organizational contexts of student affairs; mission and vision; and current trends in campus demographics and student experience in student affairs development.
  
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    LHE-7005 - Legal Issues in Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will develop a fundamental understanding of the importance of legal issues in higher education and their impact on individual rights and responsibilities as well as those of institutions of higher education.
  
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    LHE-7004 - Organization and Governance of Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, doctoral students will analyze and evaluate theories, models, and readings on approaches and structures for governing higher education organizations. This course is intended to help students understand the competencies and training necessary to undertake various operational and leadership roles. Doctoral students will gain a sound understanding of complex college and university organizations and develop a working understanding of the elements of organizations which comprise contemporary social systems. Students will explore major forces, issues, and themes which influence American society and in turn affect colleges and universities.
  
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    LHE-5013 - The Community College

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course provides a general and introductory understanding of curricular issues in a community college setting. Students will explore issues related to the community college curriculum relative to program development and management as well as assessment.
  
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    LHE-5011 - Leadership for Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the nuances of higher education leadership and theory. Emphasis will be given to the practical application of higher education leadership theories in the academic and administrative roles of an institution of higher education.
  
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    LHE-5010 - Topics in Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course explores areas of interest in higher education. Often these areas are new topics of special interest to higher education. At times, areas of higher education that are receiving attention nationally will be highlighted through this course. Students will work with faculty to create a self-directed study plan on a topic appropriate for master’s-level study.
  
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    LHE-5009 - A History of Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students are introduced to the historical origins of higher education in the United States. Significant periods in the development of higher education in this country are covered, as well as the evolution into today’s contemporary and complex system of higher education. Topics include: education models, progressive movements, federal higher education acts, community colleges, access, diversity and opportunity.
  
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    LHE-5008 - Financial Issues in Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    This course will provide students with an overview of financial issues applicable to higher education in the United States. Students will engage a broad foundation of theory, practice, research, and policy of higher education economics. Topics will include societal investment in higher education, methods of finance, costs of higher education, and budgeting concepts.
  
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    LHE-5005 - Exploring Legal Issues in Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will develop a fundamental understanding of the importance of legal issues in higher education and their impact on individual rights and responsibilities as well as those of institutions of higher education. Topics include: academic freedom, liability for student behavior, separation of church and state, antidiscrimination statutes and academic discipline.
  
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    LHE-5004 - The Organization of Higher Education

    Semester Credits: 3 Weeks: 8

    In this course, students will receive an introduction to the classical theories, traditional models, and contemporary readings regarding approaches and structures relative to organizational governance in higher education. Topics to be covered include organizational theory, governance models, campus climate, institutional change, and diversity.
 

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